702SB

  • NOW AVAILABLE with Enclosed Hard Top. Fitted with a glass windscreen and built tough for all weather conditions
  • Elevated helm position makes manoeuvring a breeze
  • Huge cabin area
  • Sleeps 4 (2 in queen size & 2 in V berth)
  • Separate stand up shower and toilet
  • Comes standard with shower and toilet ensuite, on board fresh water (hot and cold), galley module - even the kitchen sink. This is the 'Rolls Royce' of the series!
  • 260 litres fuel tank capacity
  • Tows behind a larger size 4wd
  • 8 people
  • Signature Variable Deadrise Hull

 

Configurations


Take a Tour


Specifications


Moulded length with bowsprit 7.77m
Length 6.86m
Beam 2.50m
Deadrise 21-33º
Fuel 260L
Water 50L OPT
Berths 4
Power outboard 150-300hp
Transom height 25"
Max outboard weight 350kg
Hull weight 1,200kg
Towing weight 2,800-3,200kg
BMT length 9.2m
BMT height 2.43m
BMT width 2.50m
Max people 8/720kg
Max load 1,000kg (single) / 1,090kg (twin)

Haines Signature 702SB - Marinews Review BACK


Elsewhere you'll read about the attractions of the beautiful Whitsunday Islands as a trailer boat destination. Well, this is the boat to see it in style.
The Signature 702 SB is John Haines latest offering in trailer-cruiser market that is growing in popularity these days. 
Previously John gave us the 702 Walkaround and 702 C cabin cruiser, but this new model takes us into the mini-cruiser category with innovations like a raised sunbridge and extra sleeping cabin. 
Given the sometimes-choppy waters around the Whitsunday's, the Signature 702 SB would be a superb way to cruise these waters. The big deep Vee hull enables you to quickly across the rough bits of water while the accommodation enables you to stay overnight. 
The Whitsunday's is a surprisingly big area and quite frankly I'd rather see it in a sporty trailer-cruiser like this than a slow moving yacht, or cruiser. The Signature 702 SB would allow us to see more places, and at the same time enjoy the excellent range of fishing on offer. 
Not that you have to go to exotic places to enjoy this big Signature. You can use this craft for regular weekends, fishing or cruising with family and friends. The size of the boat means you CAN do both without any real compromise. 
Yes, the price isn't cheap. However, I would suggest its not bad value at around seventy grand when you consider the alternatives in small cabin cruisers. Effectively the 702 SB provides the cruiser-like features you get in more expensive imported sport boats. 
You only have to look at the current American Sea Rays and Bayliners to see the value in this boat. The Signature 702 SB offers a similar sunbridge arrangement to the American boats, but with a vastly better cockpit for fishing. 
Here in Australia we've been slow to capitalise on the sunbridge concept, but John Haines is making up for that with this attractive model.
Unlike the American sports cruisers the 702 SB is trailable, and tuned-in to fishing. You can even take it to the shelf for a tussle with marlin, 'sails and hard fighting wahoo. 
While trailable beam of 2.5 does limit interior cabin space you've got a comfortable interior. There's also an interior toilet/shower and exterior galley. In other words, you could go 'bush' for a week or two living onboard. 
Just imagine cruising amongst tropical Queensland islands and just dropping into classy island resorts to enjoy the fun and nightlife. 
Arguably you could do the same thing in the near-sister 702 C, however this new model is better because of the raised bridge and the better cockpit for fishing. 
The high helm station of the 702 SB improves the view and feels just great when you're underway. It's even of benefit when fishing because you can clearly see what's going on behind the boat. No wonder they call it the Sportfishing model. 
A real clever bit is the curved lounge in lieu of the usual passenger seat. This means two, maybe three adults can sit up alongside the helmsman and enjoy the view. Since everyone is on the same level it's a more enjoyable arrangement from a social point of view. Certainly it's heaps better arrangement than a flybridge where the helmsman is cut off from the rest of the gang. 
Probably the only real drawback with this model is the galley being in the cockpit. This could have its drawbacks in rainy weather, but there's always a way around the problem. You could add an extended bimini cover over the rear cockpit. 
Certainly the 702 SB is a clear winner in the sleeping stakes. You can take a family of four away. There's a Vee berth with double-berth in-fill, and back aft the extra double bunk under the sunbridge. The latter is surprisingly roomy and the best choice for sleeping. The only drawback might be in really hot weather, when you might need some extra air ventilation. 

Design:
This boat shares the same hull as the other two 702 models. Length is 6.86m with pod, or 7.02m including the moulded fibreglass bowsprit. It has a hull weight of 1300kg and beam of 2.5m which means it's legally trailable. 
Some of the attractive features of this design include the fully moulded cockpit, easy stern access and standing headroom within the cabin. 
The hull is typical John Haines Signature with a sharp bow entry flowing back into the slightly concave; 'gull-wing' hull sections. 
Looking at the transom there's distinct chine flats as well as a flat edge to the keel. The beauty of this hull shape is you get the wave-cutting effect of a deep-Vee without the high surface drag. That means better fuel consumption. 
The deadrise to chine level is 21 degrees, but effectively it's up to 30 degrees if you take into account the concave sections. 
The bottom features clean, sharp strakes and the chine edge running right to the bows. The sharp bow entry still retains quite a bit of fullness in the forefoot. No doubt this is to give extra buoyancy when running with the waves. 
The topsides feature a moderate amount of bow flare to help throw the spray out and away. Meanwhile, the low gunwale line of the hull sets the sporty tone of this design. 
The deck styling with rounded curved cabin looks very up to date with modern trends. No doubt Signature should manage to export a few of these boats. Among other places, Signatures are sold in Japan and New Zealand. 
The Signature 702SB is available in both outboard and sterndrive version. You can even have it in a diesel sterndrive, though diesel is prohibitively expensive these days. 
The boat comes standard with 260 litres of in-floor fuel so there shouldn't be too much problem with running out of fuel. 
Trail weight of the 702SB is upwards of three tonnes, so you'd better get a fairly powerful vehicle to do the towing. For this reason I'm sure some of these boats will end up in dry-store racks. 
Suitable tow vehicles that spring to mind include the Toyota LandCruiser, or Holden Suburban, but forget about doing it with the old Falcon Ute!  
Test: 
Greg Haines and myself took the boat for a run through the Seaway to check performance in the rough stuff. The results were very impressive with the boat riding very comfortable in the lumpy seas outside. 
The boat handles very well in turns and seemed to sit well at all times due to a low centre of gravity. 
The higher helm station certain makes this a nicer boat to drive in open water than the 702 C model, certainly you don't need to stand up because vision is so good. 
The high helm position gives you a commanding view of the waves ahead, which is a great help in picking your course through rough water. 
The driving station is also very comfortable and provides good protection and vision through the high, wrap-around windscreen. 
The padded pedestal seat for the driver has a fore/aft and vertical adjustment as well as a proper footrest. You also get a fully recessed throttle box, modern wood-grain dash and raised instrument panel with flush-mounted sounder and GPS. Meanwhile, there's the wrap-around lounge on the passenger side that's so comfortable you wonder why no one thought of it before! 
The ride was quite dry and suggests this could be a very good boat for extended runs offshore. Provided the crew are experienced it would be a first-class offshore tournament boat. 
At-rest stability was quite good, though you do notice hull roll more when you're standing on the bridge. However there's no doubt these new wider-bodied Signature hulls are a lot more stable at-rest than the earlier, narrow Signature series. 

Deck Layout: 
Up for'ard you get a proper bowrail for support as well a bowsprit anchor platform with a tilt style roller to make anchoring easier. 
There's a split bowrail and Tee bollard to carry the anchor on-deck. You also have a separate anchor well, though in true offshore conditions it wouldn't be used much. 
The interesting point about the 702SB is it still manages to maintain a practical fishing cockpit. Admitted the area is less than you get in some boats this size, however the floor is raised to the right height and fully moulded so it's easy to wash out. It isn't self-draining as such, but it drains into a stern sump serviced by an electric bilge pump. 
The cockpit measures 141cm long by 182cm wide with internal freeboard varying from 92cm to 76cm in the stern corners. 
I was pleased to see a high rear deck to help keep the waves out. There's also very good non-skid on both the landing platform and stern deck edge. 
The high square-topped cockpit edges are just wide enough for rod-holders and a recessed grab rail. There's also a narrow side deck around the cabin so you can go for'ard to the anchor, or the mooring lines without going through the cabin. 
The cockpit also features double-deck side pockets for stowage of fishing gear and other items. There's also a removable floor carpet, recessed grab rails and a step-through transom door on the starboard side. 
The raised sunbridge forms a low step in the cockpit floor about amidships. This 'step' incorporates a padded seat, as well as a large icebox. Over on the portside is a raised moulding that incorporates the curved lounge as well as a galley unit. 
A lid lifts up to reveal the sink, whilst a locker doors hides the small stove. The locker door forms a table on which you can do the cooking while you've got some space underneath for pots, pans and dry food stores. 
The sink comes in handy for 'washing up' after fishing as well as cooking. It has one of those telescopic hose lines that are so handy for fresh water showers as well! 
Moving up to the bridge we find a number of good ideas like the recess in the bulkhead for EPIRB and fire extinguisher. It's great to see these safety items clearly visible to the crew, and easy to reach in cases of emergency. 
The bridge features its own snap-down floor carpet and moulded fibreglass cabin door. You also get drink-holders around the helm and non-reflective finish on the dash. 
The cabin has moulded bunks and moulded WC/shower compartment. There's a double-berth in-fill and padded backrests all finished in an attractive woven fabric. This cabin has tinted window ports and a Frontrunner carpet headliner. You wouldn't call it super luxury, but it is very comfortable and very practical. 
The toilet compartment has a moulded seat and telescopic shower hose so you can sit down and have a shower. There's 90 litres of water so you better take short showers! 
I was pleased to see that one of the two Sowpac toilet hatches gives access to the helm electrics. There's also a floor hatch to give access to the shower bilge pump. 

Fishability:
This is a particularly good fishing cockpit given you can stand three people across the stern. There's plenty of side pocket stowage as well as rod and gaff rack built-in. 
The sterndrive version losses space because of the engine box but still wouldn't be too bad for fishing. There will still be room in each in the stern quarters for an angler to lock himself and be reasonably comfortable. 
Signature provides four rod holders, but you can also get more fitted. Fishing options also include a raised cutting board and a fully plumbed live-bait tank. 
The stern actually has a fold down table, but you can also order the boat with a removable three-seater lounge. Whatever way you go it wouldn't be too hard at all to turn this boat into a super offshore fishing machine. 
For fishing I certainly would strongly suggest you add the bimini/clears and sounder/GPS. And don't forget a radio, safety gear and a Targa rod-rack.

Power: 
We previously tested the 702 with a 210hp V-6 MerCruiser which went pretty well with a top speed of 38 knots. This time around we had the minium recommended power of a single 150hp outboard, which still got us a reasonably good top end speed of 34 knots at 5600rpm.
Mid cruising speed was about 23 knots at 4000rpm. 
I was pretty happy with the performance of the Mercury OptiMax 150hp and I wouldn't be in a hurry to go much bigger. I suppose a 175hp size would be ideal given the demand with heavier payloads. The boat is actually rated up to a 225hp outboard. 
There are lots of power options in this boat including sterndrives up to 210hp. The sterndrive gives the advantage of a cleaner stern for fishing, yet conversely loses room in the cockpit due to the engine box. Really the OptiMax provides a better deal because it doesn't take up as much space and is fairly thrifty on fuel. We didn't get a chance to do fuel consumption tests, but we already know OptiMax does achieve better results than a conventional two-stroke. 
Another way to go is fitting a pair of 90 -100hp outboards. John Smales in Sydney has sold a number of these models with twin Honda 90hp and from all reports the combination works really well. The twins fit on the same pod provided, they are the slimmer in-line cylinder types. 
The 702 SB comes standard with twin batteries, isolating master switch, cabin and navigation lights as well as electric bilge pump and electric water pump.

Verdict:
OK this isn't exactly the boat we can all afford, but if you're lucky to have the money go for it! There's certainly not many boats around at present which are going to give you the cruising and offshore fishing capacity while still remaining a trailer proposition. 
Particularly when you look at what you pay these days for a Bertram, Wellcraft or something similar the Signature 702 SB looks pretty reasonable. For $72,800 you get the boat as you see it with Lowrance sounder and GPS plotter included. You also get a deluxe rigging kit and bimini/clears. However, you don't get the trailer so you're probably looking at another $5,000 or more since the trailer needs brake-away brakes. 
Certainly you will get a lot of value out of a boat like this because it isn't limited by weather factors so much. You'll be able to use it year round for fishing and cruising. You'll even save a few bucks by using it as a holiday home! 
Overall though what this boat is about is quality time afloat, being able to take family and friends along with you in comfort. 
So if you fancy a trailable sports cruiser and have visions of visiting some exotic places start thinking about putting your 'signature' on this Signature. But first, start saving those pennies!

 

Review By www.marinews.com
http://www.marinews.com/boat-test/haines-signature-702sb/147/ 

Videos


Upholstery colours


Personalise your Siganture

Signature™ boats and Nautolex are proud to be associated with the PreFixx range of maritime seat vinyls - standard on all Signature™ models. Unsurpassed cleanability and wear from a marine seating fabric, PreFixx protection offers you the latest technology to remove stains that could never be removed before. With a test proven abrasion resistance, PreFixx protected products protect you from high maintenance costs and from frequent reupholstery costs. PreFixx protected Nautolex materials - cleanable with strong, active solvents without damage.

Primary Upholstery Colours
Secondary Upholstery Colours
Stitching Colours

Hull colours [Gellcoat]


Trim colours


Personalise your Siganture

Standard Cloth Trim Colours
Upgrade Colours
702SB

Optional Extras

Configurations

Specifications

Moulded length with bowsprit 7.77m
Length 6.86m
Beam 2.50m
Deadrise 21-33º
Fuel 260L
Water 50L OPT
Berths 4
Power outboard 150-300hp
Transom height 25"
Max outboard weight 350kg
Hull weight 1,200kg
Towing weight 2,800-3,200kg
BMT length 9.2m
BMT height 2.43m
BMT width 2.50m
Max people 8/720kg
Max load 1,000kg (single) / 1,090kg (twin)

Haines Signature 702SB - Marinews Review BACK

Elsewhere you'll read about the attractions of the beautiful Whitsunday Islands as a trailer boat destination. Well, this is the boat to see it in style.
The Signature 702 SB is John Haines latest offering in trailer-cruiser market that is growing in popularity these days. 
Previously John gave us the 702 Walkaround and 702 C cabin cruiser, but this new model takes us into the mini-cruiser category with innovations like a raised sunbridge and extra sleeping cabin. 
Given the sometimes-choppy waters around the Whitsunday's, the Signature 702 SB would be a superb way to cruise these waters. The big deep Vee hull enables you to quickly across the rough bits of water while the accommodation enables you to stay overnight. 
The Whitsunday's is a surprisingly big area and quite frankly I'd rather see it in a sporty trailer-cruiser like this than a slow moving yacht, or cruiser. The Signature 702 SB would allow us to see more places, and at the same time enjoy the excellent range of fishing on offer. 
Not that you have to go to exotic places to enjoy this big Signature. You can use this craft for regular weekends, fishing or cruising with family and friends. The size of the boat means you CAN do both without any real compromise. 
Yes, the price isn't cheap. However, I would suggest its not bad value at around seventy grand when you consider the alternatives in small cabin cruisers. Effectively the 702 SB provides the cruiser-like features you get in more expensive imported sport boats. 
You only have to look at the current American Sea Rays and Bayliners to see the value in this boat. The Signature 702 SB offers a similar sunbridge arrangement to the American boats, but with a vastly better cockpit for fishing. 
Here in Australia we've been slow to capitalise on the sunbridge concept, but John Haines is making up for that with this attractive model.
Unlike the American sports cruisers the 702 SB is trailable, and tuned-in to fishing. You can even take it to the shelf for a tussle with marlin, 'sails and hard fighting wahoo. 
While trailable beam of 2.5 does limit interior cabin space you've got a comfortable interior. There's also an interior toilet/shower and exterior galley. In other words, you could go 'bush' for a week or two living onboard. 
Just imagine cruising amongst tropical Queensland islands and just dropping into classy island resorts to enjoy the fun and nightlife. 
Arguably you could do the same thing in the near-sister 702 C, however this new model is better because of the raised bridge and the better cockpit for fishing. 
The high helm station of the 702 SB improves the view and feels just great when you're underway. It's even of benefit when fishing because you can clearly see what's going on behind the boat. No wonder they call it the Sportfishing model. 
A real clever bit is the curved lounge in lieu of the usual passenger seat. This means two, maybe three adults can sit up alongside the helmsman and enjoy the view. Since everyone is on the same level it's a more enjoyable arrangement from a social point of view. Certainly it's heaps better arrangement than a flybridge where the helmsman is cut off from the rest of the gang. 
Probably the only real drawback with this model is the galley being in the cockpit. This could have its drawbacks in rainy weather, but there's always a way around the problem. You could add an extended bimini cover over the rear cockpit. 
Certainly the 702 SB is a clear winner in the sleeping stakes. You can take a family of four away. There's a Vee berth with double-berth in-fill, and back aft the extra double bunk under the sunbridge. The latter is surprisingly roomy and the best choice for sleeping. The only drawback might be in really hot weather, when you might need some extra air ventilation. 

Design:
This boat shares the same hull as the other two 702 models. Length is 6.86m with pod, or 7.02m including the moulded fibreglass bowsprit. It has a hull weight of 1300kg and beam of 2.5m which means it's legally trailable. 
Some of the attractive features of this design include the fully moulded cockpit, easy stern access and standing headroom within the cabin. 
The hull is typical John Haines Signature with a sharp bow entry flowing back into the slightly concave; 'gull-wing' hull sections. 
Looking at the transom there's distinct chine flats as well as a flat edge to the keel. The beauty of this hull shape is you get the wave-cutting effect of a deep-Vee without the high surface drag. That means better fuel consumption. 
The deadrise to chine level is 21 degrees, but effectively it's up to 30 degrees if you take into account the concave sections. 
The bottom features clean, sharp strakes and the chine edge running right to the bows. The sharp bow entry still retains quite a bit of fullness in the forefoot. No doubt this is to give extra buoyancy when running with the waves. 
The topsides feature a moderate amount of bow flare to help throw the spray out and away. Meanwhile, the low gunwale line of the hull sets the sporty tone of this design. 
The deck styling with rounded curved cabin looks very up to date with modern trends. No doubt Signature should manage to export a few of these boats. Among other places, Signatures are sold in Japan and New Zealand. 
The Signature 702SB is available in both outboard and sterndrive version. You can even have it in a diesel sterndrive, though diesel is prohibitively expensive these days. 
The boat comes standard with 260 litres of in-floor fuel so there shouldn't be too much problem with running out of fuel. 
Trail weight of the 702SB is upwards of three tonnes, so you'd better get a fairly powerful vehicle to do the towing. For this reason I'm sure some of these boats will end up in dry-store racks. 
Suitable tow vehicles that spring to mind include the Toyota LandCruiser, or Holden Suburban, but forget about doing it with the old Falcon Ute!  
Test: 
Greg Haines and myself took the boat for a run through the Seaway to check performance in the rough stuff. The results were very impressive with the boat riding very comfortable in the lumpy seas outside. 
The boat handles very well in turns and seemed to sit well at all times due to a low centre of gravity. 
The higher helm station certain makes this a nicer boat to drive in open water than the 702 C model, certainly you don't need to stand up because vision is so good. 
The high helm position gives you a commanding view of the waves ahead, which is a great help in picking your course through rough water. 
The driving station is also very comfortable and provides good protection and vision through the high, wrap-around windscreen. 
The padded pedestal seat for the driver has a fore/aft and vertical adjustment as well as a proper footrest. You also get a fully recessed throttle box, modern wood-grain dash and raised instrument panel with flush-mounted sounder and GPS. Meanwhile, there's the wrap-around lounge on the passenger side that's so comfortable you wonder why no one thought of it before! 
The ride was quite dry and suggests this could be a very good boat for extended runs offshore. Provided the crew are experienced it would be a first-class offshore tournament boat. 
At-rest stability was quite good, though you do notice hull roll more when you're standing on the bridge. However there's no doubt these new wider-bodied Signature hulls are a lot more stable at-rest than the earlier, narrow Signature series. 

Deck Layout: 
Up for'ard you get a proper bowrail for support as well a bowsprit anchor platform with a tilt style roller to make anchoring easier. 
There's a split bowrail and Tee bollard to carry the anchor on-deck. You also have a separate anchor well, though in true offshore conditions it wouldn't be used much. 
The interesting point about the 702SB is it still manages to maintain a practical fishing cockpit. Admitted the area is less than you get in some boats this size, however the floor is raised to the right height and fully moulded so it's easy to wash out. It isn't self-draining as such, but it drains into a stern sump serviced by an electric bilge pump. 
The cockpit measures 141cm long by 182cm wide with internal freeboard varying from 92cm to 76cm in the stern corners. 
I was pleased to see a high rear deck to help keep the waves out. There's also very good non-skid on both the landing platform and stern deck edge. 
The high square-topped cockpit edges are just wide enough for rod-holders and a recessed grab rail. There's also a narrow side deck around the cabin so you can go for'ard to the anchor, or the mooring lines without going through the cabin. 
The cockpit also features double-deck side pockets for stowage of fishing gear and other items. There's also a removable floor carpet, recessed grab rails and a step-through transom door on the starboard side. 
The raised sunbridge forms a low step in the cockpit floor about amidships. This 'step' incorporates a padded seat, as well as a large icebox. Over on the portside is a raised moulding that incorporates the curved lounge as well as a galley unit. 
A lid lifts up to reveal the sink, whilst a locker doors hides the small stove. The locker door forms a table on which you can do the cooking while you've got some space underneath for pots, pans and dry food stores. 
The sink comes in handy for 'washing up' after fishing as well as cooking. It has one of those telescopic hose lines that are so handy for fresh water showers as well! 
Moving up to the bridge we find a number of good ideas like the recess in the bulkhead for EPIRB and fire extinguisher. It's great to see these safety items clearly visible to the crew, and easy to reach in cases of emergency. 
The bridge features its own snap-down floor carpet and moulded fibreglass cabin door. You also get drink-holders around the helm and non-reflective finish on the dash. 
The cabin has moulded bunks and moulded WC/shower compartment. There's a double-berth in-fill and padded backrests all finished in an attractive woven fabric. This cabin has tinted window ports and a Frontrunner carpet headliner. You wouldn't call it super luxury, but it is very comfortable and very practical. 
The toilet compartment has a moulded seat and telescopic shower hose so you can sit down and have a shower. There's 90 litres of water so you better take short showers! 
I was pleased to see that one of the two Sowpac toilet hatches gives access to the helm electrics. There's also a floor hatch to give access to the shower bilge pump. 

Fishability:
This is a particularly good fishing cockpit given you can stand three people across the stern. There's plenty of side pocket stowage as well as rod and gaff rack built-in. 
The sterndrive version losses space because of the engine box but still wouldn't be too bad for fishing. There will still be room in each in the stern quarters for an angler to lock himself and be reasonably comfortable. 
Signature provides four rod holders, but you can also get more fitted. Fishing options also include a raised cutting board and a fully plumbed live-bait tank. 
The stern actually has a fold down table, but you can also order the boat with a removable three-seater lounge. Whatever way you go it wouldn't be too hard at all to turn this boat into a super offshore fishing machine. 
For fishing I certainly would strongly suggest you add the bimini/clears and sounder/GPS. And don't forget a radio, safety gear and a Targa rod-rack.

Power: 
We previously tested the 702 with a 210hp V-6 MerCruiser which went pretty well with a top speed of 38 knots. This time around we had the minium recommended power of a single 150hp outboard, which still got us a reasonably good top end speed of 34 knots at 5600rpm.
Mid cruising speed was about 23 knots at 4000rpm. 
I was pretty happy with the performance of the Mercury OptiMax 150hp and I wouldn't be in a hurry to go much bigger. I suppose a 175hp size would be ideal given the demand with heavier payloads. The boat is actually rated up to a 225hp outboard. 
There are lots of power options in this boat including sterndrives up to 210hp. The sterndrive gives the advantage of a cleaner stern for fishing, yet conversely loses room in the cockpit due to the engine box. Really the OptiMax provides a better deal because it doesn't take up as much space and is fairly thrifty on fuel. We didn't get a chance to do fuel consumption tests, but we already know OptiMax does achieve better results than a conventional two-stroke. 
Another way to go is fitting a pair of 90 -100hp outboards. John Smales in Sydney has sold a number of these models with twin Honda 90hp and from all reports the combination works really well. The twins fit on the same pod provided, they are the slimmer in-line cylinder types. 
The 702 SB comes standard with twin batteries, isolating master switch, cabin and navigation lights as well as electric bilge pump and electric water pump.

Verdict:
OK this isn't exactly the boat we can all afford, but if you're lucky to have the money go for it! There's certainly not many boats around at present which are going to give you the cruising and offshore fishing capacity while still remaining a trailer proposition. 
Particularly when you look at what you pay these days for a Bertram, Wellcraft or something similar the Signature 702 SB looks pretty reasonable. For $72,800 you get the boat as you see it with Lowrance sounder and GPS plotter included. You also get a deluxe rigging kit and bimini/clears. However, you don't get the trailer so you're probably looking at another $5,000 or more since the trailer needs brake-away brakes. 
Certainly you will get a lot of value out of a boat like this because it isn't limited by weather factors so much. You'll be able to use it year round for fishing and cruising. You'll even save a few bucks by using it as a holiday home! 
Overall though what this boat is about is quality time afloat, being able to take family and friends along with you in comfort. 
So if you fancy a trailable sports cruiser and have visions of visiting some exotic places start thinking about putting your 'signature' on this Signature. But first, start saving those pennies!

 

Review By www.marinews.com
http://www.marinews.com/boat-test/haines-signature-702sb/147/ 

Videos

Upholstery colours

Signature™ boats and Nautolex are proud to be associated with the PreFixx range of maritime seat vinyls - standard on all Signature™ models. Unsurpassed cleanability and wear from a marine seating fabric, PreFixx protection offers you the latest technology to remove stains that could never be removed before. With a test proven abrasion resistance, PreFixx protected products protect you from high maintenance costs and from frequent reupholstery costs. PreFixx protected Nautolex materials - cleanable with strong, active solvents without damage.

Primary Upholstery Colours
Secondary Upholstery Colours
Stitching Colours

Trim colours

Standard Cloth Trim Colours
Upgrade Colours