525RF
  • Ideal fishing/watersports boat
  • Massive cockpit space
  • Heaps of storage: upfront under the bow, killtanks under the floor and large moulded side pockets for rods, gaffs and tackle
  • Transom door – makes it really easy to board after swimming

Configurations


Take a Tour


Specifications


Moulded length with bowsprit 5.25m
Length 5.25m
Beam 2.13m
Deadrise 21−33°
Fuel 100L
Water N/A
Berths Day
Power outboard 70−115HP
Transom height 25"
Max outboard weight 200kg
Hull weight approx. 750kg
Towing weight approx. 1,250kg
BMT length approx. 6.10m
BMT height approx. 2.20m
BMT width 2.13m
Max people 5/450kg
Max load 650kg

Haines Signature 525RF - Fishing World Review BACK


Big Ambitions - Haines Signiture 502RF

19 Jan 2012

Fishing World - October 2011

REVIEWED: HAINES SIGNATURE 502 RF

SCOTT THOMAS  checks out a small boat with a lot to offer for fishos seeking versatility – the new Haines Signature 502 RF.

FIVE metres doesn’t always equal a small  boat. Well, that’s what I was hoping as we followed The Haines Group’s larger Traveller TF 200 (see August 2011 Boat Fishing) out through the Gold Coast's  Seaway in search of a few snapper, or maybe a mack tuna or two. As it turned out, besides the surge through the Seaway, the seas were dead flat and heading  offshore in a smallish boat presented few issues. However, the Haines Group’s  new 502 RF does certainly seem to offer big boat performance in a small neat package.

Fishing World colleague Mick Fletoridis was onboard the Traveller with The Haines  Group’s Greg Haines and Nikki Winter. The Haines Group’s Stuart Smith was  onboard the 502RF with me. As Mick already outlined in August Boat  Fishing, the perfect conditions didn’t equate to perfect fishing and the swarms of mack tuna we saw the previous day had completely vanished. 

Even so, we tried trolling and dropping soft plastics down, which allowed for a decent appraisal of the boat’s fishability at sea. 

Runabout Fisherman
The Haines group offers three boat brands  in its line up with Traveller, Seafarer and Signature, with the latter the “prestige” brand for those wanting the best from a boat in performance and design. The “RF” refers to “Runabout Fisherman” with The Haines Group designing the new model with versatility in mind. The cabin has been brought forward to allow plenty of fishing deck space extending back to the transom. While this is a fishing magazine, a “family friendly” boat could mean the difference to  accessing those well guarded finances from the missus! Unlike many boat brands on the market, mostly imports, who try too hard to offer family and fishing  features, THG has left the 502’s simplicity, space, shelter and ride comfort as its main family friendly attributes. In other words, no giant lounges or  unnecessary add-on gadgets that get in the way of the real reason you bought the  boat: to go fishing. It’s a simple, yet practical boat with heaps of space for a  few mates to fish comfortably. 

The test boat featured a 90hp Suzuki A  series. The new A series 90 features Lean Burn technology, which according to  the brochures, offers great fuel savings by allowing the engine to run on a more efficient mixture through the use of a lean air-fuel ratio. Another handy feature of these outboards is tilt limiter, a simple, but handy feature which allows you to customise where the outboard will stop tilting and can save bait boards, etc, from getting squashed by a tilting motor. 

The transom has a door and step down ladder for making entering and exiting the boat much easier, on and off the water. 

The transom also features a roomy livewell which also doubled on test day as a ice box. For the family fisho, there’s a fold-down seat which tucks away nicely and would comfortably seat a couple people. There’s also a couple of useful Tallon mounts towards the transom. Tallon, which are fitted across The Haines Group boat ranges are a handy flush mount for attaching a range of accessories including drink holders, bait boards, lights, etc. It’s a great way Haines has kept the gunwales relatively clutter free while still offering a  choice of accessories when you need them. Under the gunwales there’s plenty of  space in the parcel shelves and a handy built-in fish measuring ruler nearby.

Good stability and a generous amount of freeboard adds to the boat’s  fishability and would lend itself to light offshore work chasing snapper, kings, etc. Of course, it would also be equally at home inside the estuary.

There’s ample space around the helm. Swivelling seats allow both driver and passengers to turn around and face the transom while fishing, if they wish. However, I  found the swivelling helm seat could easily knock the throttle. The test boat dash featured a Garmin 4515 sounder and gauges including fuel, tacho, speed, and trim/tilt. The dash had sufficient space on offer for more electronics or a larger  sounder unit.

Opposite the helm in front of the passenger seat there’s a deep glove box for putting valuables, which also doubles as an insulated ice box. For more storage, Haines has added a shallow storage bin under the floor between passenger and helm seats.

Further forward towards the bow, the walkthrough windscreen allows access to the anchor well and there's more storage inside the bow.

Smooth riding
The Haines Group’s Signature is the company’s premium brand and this 502 reflected the company’s promise in both ride and overall finish. It was a fun, sporty and dry boat to drive. Hard turns at speed  were too easy and good fun in the mild sea. The patented Signature Variable  Deadrise Hull goes from 21 to 33 degrees, which equates to a seriously smooth  ride and surprisingly good stability. Haines says its SVDH technology helps in lifting the boat onto the plane and keeps it there at lower speeds, which results in fuel savings at lower speeds. On the subject of speeds, the 90hp Suzuki gave a good account of itself with a comfortable cruising speed of 24  knots at 4500 RPM and WOT at 31 knots and 6000 RPM. The maximum power rating is 115hp if you’re looking for more speed. For a 5-metre boat, the 502RF really  gives a good account of itself.    ¦

Haines Signature 502RF 
Length: LOA 5.25m
Beam: 2.13m
Deadrise: 21-33  degrees
Weight: Approx. 475kg (hull only);towing approx. 1120kg
Power: Rec. 70-115hp
Price: From $41,205; as tested $48,601
Fit out: ****
Ride/Handling: *****
Performance: ****
Fishability: ****
Overall finish: ****
Value: ****
Overall: ****

 

Words By Scott Thomas
http://www.fishingworld.com.au/news/big-ambitions-haines-signiture-502rf 

Haines Signature 525RF - RedBook Review BACK


The new Signature 502RF might look unconventional, says Kevin Smith, but take a closer look and you'll see just how clever and original the design is.

LIKES
- Comfortable ride in rough conditions
- Higher gunwales in stern are a good child safety feature
- Moulded fish measurer in sidepocket
- Overall finish

DISLIKES
- Out of the hole performance in turns poor due to cavitation
- Hydraulic steering would be a good idea (it’s optional)
- Angle of dash unsuitable for flush-mounted sounders or GPS

OVERVIEW
- Distinctive features
They always say that change is as good as a holiday, and that definitely applies to the new Signature 502RF (Runabout Fisher), a boat with a unique design and distinctive colour scheme. Most manufacturers have to keep up to date with modern designs and trends of course, but every now and then something very different pops up. When these designs emerge they inevitably tend to raise eyebrows, but then they’re also quite refreshing.
So it is with the new Signature. But what’s so different about this particular boat?

Firstly, the 502RF has curvy lines extending from the bow, as you’d expect, but it then changes to a square cut-off in the stern -- without tapering or curving back towards the transom. That certainly looks different. However, when you take a closer look at the stern it makes sense, particularly when it comes to creating a bit of extra comfort, space, and safety. The gunwales in the stern are higher than usual without the taper, which is great because it’ll keep kids in, rather than out. The seating in the stern is also a tad more comfortable because the back rest is now higher than usual, and with this compact design, the additional space becomes more evident.

The second distinctive feature is a colour break in orange, which is certainly enough to create general interest in the boat. Even so, it’s not over the top as far as I’m concerned and the more I studied it the more I liked it.

LAYOUT AND ACCOMMODATION
- Clever touches
The balance of the internal layout has interesting features incorporated into this family-cum-fishing boat. Besides the compact stern there’s room for dual boarding platforms, a transom door, livewell/icebox, and a good size rear lounge that folds away neatly. Beneath this are the bilgepump, filter and battery.

The deck is speckled non-slip material with a carpeted centre section, there’s a stowage hatch, and the gunwales have built-in pockets with plenty of space to lock toes in underneath. Another simple but really nice feature is a fish measurer moulded into the side of the gunwale pocket, a far more practical idea than having to plaster those ugly stickers on the boat.

Yet another clever touch -- and one that makes a substantial difference -- is the beading around otherwise hard edges, plus some built-in lighting, as well as specialised multi-purpose fittings called Tallon receivers. These fittings are the base to a number of interchangeable accessories from drinkholders to rodholders and even lighting fixtures. They’re quite nifty (check out www.tallonsystems.com to see what I mean).

AT THE HELM
- Comfortable and quiet
Console seating comprises adjustable, dual-moulded swivel seats with cushion inserts that can be removed. The passenger side has a glovebox/icebox in the dash and there’s more storage space underneath, while the skipper’s side has a neat dash setup with a fair amount of space for smaller electronics.

Overall, it’s pretty comfortable, with clear vision through the wide wraparound screen. Between the two is a walkthrough section, which is fantastic for accessing the anchor hatch in the bow. The windscreen folds back and the bow opens up through a hinged door, creating access to the stowage beneath and on either side, as well as to the anchor hatch. In ideal conditions you could leave it all open for extra ventilation while in less perfect conditions you could close it for protection.

A simple bimini top for shade complements the console area. Another notable part of the design and layout is in the recessed handles and moulded non-slip material all the way through to the bow.

On the performance side, ride and general handling were real winners. Sporting a 90hp Suzuki four-stroke, the 502 had enough get up and go to suit a small family and could do double-duty as a boat for light skiing. There was an exceptionally smooth transition to the plane but personally I felt the 90 lacked a bit of bottom-end out of the hole. 

I reckon that with a 115, this boat would have the ideal setup.

Signature hulls have a unique feature in their "Variable Deadrise" design -- in this instance from 21 to 33 degrees. A flat plank design off the keel that tapers to the bow makes it easier for the hull to get on the plane and at the same time maximises fuel economy. The concave hull is yet another interesting part to the Signature range because (in addition to its many other benefits) it helps create a smooth and dry ride. We ran in a 15-knot wind over the current and I’d have to say that maintaining a speed of over 18kts (33km/h) in these conditions was quite impressive. The hull was even foam-filled, which, in addition to every other positive characteristic, made it nice and quiet.

We conducted our mandatory performance tests, including tight turns at high speeds and out of the hole acceleration. At high speed the 502RF sat firm with moderate cavitation while at lower speeds out of the hole and under full-lock the cavitation was more evident. This was due to the motor being set up slightly high, which is of course easy to change.

I spent a fair amount of time testing the Signature 502RF and I’d say it fits right into the family boating and fishing category. It has an interesting design and plenty of standard features that many other boats simply don’t offer. It has ample space, performs well, and is ready to go without you needing to spend a big fat wad. It’s definitely a value for money package.
   
Specifications:
Price as tested: $48,601
Options fitted: Battery, bimini with zips, carbon fibre dash, Garmin 4515, ladder, recessed cockpit lighting, Suzuki control cables and engine fitup, aft lounge folding seating, sports steering wheel, Tallon receivers, Dunbier trailer, transom step, two-tone deck and hull
Priced from: $41,205

General:
Type: Deep-vee family/fishing crossover
Material: GRP
Length: 5.05m (incl. bowsprit)
Beam: 2.13m
Weight (hull): Approx. 475kg
Weight (towing): Approx. 1120kg
Deadrise: 21-33 degrees
Fuel: 100lt
People: 5
Min. rec. HP: 70
Max. rec. HP: 115

Engine:
Make/model: Suzuki DF 90 A
Type: Four-stroke, DOHC, 16-valve
Displacement: 1502cc
Engine weight: 155kg (long shaft)
Gear ratio: 2.59:1

Supplied by:
The Haines Group
140 Viking Drive
Wacol, Qld, 4076
Tel: (07) 3271 4400
Web: www.thehainesgroup.com 


Review Supplied By Redbook.com.au
http://www.redbook.com.au/boat-reviews/2011/runabout/haines-signature/502-rf/haines-signature-502rf-26755?csn_tnet=true

Haines Signature 525RF - Trade Boats Review BACK


The new Signature 502RF (formerly Haines Signature) might look unconventional, says Kevin Smith, but take a closer look and you’ll see just how clever and original the design is.

 
SIGNATURE 502RF

TEST: SIGNATURE 502RF

They always say that change is as good as a holiday, and that definitely applies to the new Signature 502RF (Runabout Fisher), a boat with a unique design and distinctive colour scheme. Most manufacturers have to keep up to date with modern designs and trends of course, but every now and then something very different pops up. When these designs emerge they inevitably tend to raise eyebrows, but then they're also quite refreshing.

So it is with the new Signature. But what's so different about this particular boat?

Firstly, the 502RF has curvy lines extending from the bow, as you'd expect, but it then changes to a square cut-off in the stern - without tapering or curving back towards the transom. That certainly looks different. However, when you take a closer look at the stern it makes sense, particularly when it comes to creating a bit of extra comfort, space, and safety. The gunwales in the stern are higher than usual without the taper, which is great because it'll keep kids in, rather than out. The seating in the stern is also a tad more comfortable because the back rest is now higher than usual, and with this compact design, the additional space becomes more evident.

The second distinctive feature is a colour break in orange, which is certainly enough to create general interest in the boat. Even so, it's not over the top as far as I'm concerned and the more I studied it the more I liked it.

 

 

SMART LAYOUT

The balance of the internal layout has interesting features incorporated into this family-cum fishing boat. Besides the compact stern there's room for dual-boarding platforms, a transom door, livewell/icebox, and a good size rear lounge that folds away neatly. Beneath this are the bilgepump, filter and battery.

The deck is speckled non-slip material with a carpeted centre section, there's a stowage hatch, and the gunwales have built-in pockets with plenty of space to lock toes in underneath. Another simple but really nice feature is a fish measurer moulded into the side of the gunwale pocket, a far more practical idea than having to plaster those ugly stickers on the boat. Yet another clever touch - and one that makes a substantial difference - is the beading around otherwise hard edges, plus some built-in lighting, as well as specialised multi-purpose fittings called Tallon receivers. These fittings are the base to a number of interchangeable accessories from drinkholders to rodholders and even lighting fixtures. They're quite nifty (check out www.tallonsystems.com to see what I mean).

 

 

AT THE HELM

Console seating comprises adjustable, dual-moulded swivel seats with cushion inserts that can be removed. The passenger side has a glovebox/icebox in the dash, there's more storage space underneath, while the skipper's side has a neat dash setup with a fair amount of space for smaller electronics. Overall it's pretty comfortable, with clear vision through the wide wraparound screen. Between the two is a walkthrough section, which is fantastic for accessing the anchor hatch in the bow. The windscreen folds back and the bow opens up through a hinged door, creating access to the stowage beneath and on either side, as well as to the anchor hatch. In ideal conditions you could leave it all open for extra ventilation while in less perfect conditions you could close it for protection.

A simple bimini top for shade complements the console area. Another notable part of the design and layout is in the recessed handles and moulded non-slip material all the way through to the bow.

On the performance side, ride and general handling were real winners for me. Sporting a 90hp Suzuki four-stroke, the 502 had enough get up and go to suit a small family and could do double-duty as a boat for light skiing. There was an exceptionally smooth transition to the plane but personally I felt the 90 lacked a bit of bottom-end out of the hole.
I reckon that with a 115, this boat would have the ideal setup.

Signature hulls have a unique feature in their "Variable Deadrise" design - in this instance from 21° to 33°. A flat plank design off the keel that tapers to the bow makes it easier for the hull to get on the plane and at the same time maximises fuel economy. The concave hull is yet another interesting part to the Signature range because (in addition to its many other benefits) it helps create a smooth and dry ride. We ran in a 15-knot wind over the current and I'd have to say that maintaining a speed of over 18kts (33kmh) in these conditions was quite impressive. The hull was even foam-filled, which in addition to every other positive characteristic made it nice and quiet.

We conducted our mandatory performance tests, including tight turns at high speeds and out of the hole acceleration. At high speed the 502RF sat firm with moderate cavitation while at lower speeds out of the hole and under full-lock the cavitation was more evident. This was due to the motor being set up slightly high, which is of course easy to change.

 

 

THE WRAP

I spent a fair amount of time testing the Signature 502RF and I'd say it fits right into the family boating and fishing category. It has an interesting design and plenty of standard features that many other boats simply don't offer. It has ample space, performs well, and is ready to go without you needing to spend a big fat wad. It's definitely a value for money package.

 

 

 

 

 

Specifications: Signature 502RF

 

 

HOW MUCH?

Price as tested: $48,601

Options fitted: Battery, bimini with zips, carbon fibre dash, Garmin 4515, ladder, recessed cockpit lighting, Suzuki control cables and engine fitup, aft lounge folding seating, sports steering wheel, Tallon receivers, Dunbier trailer, transom step, two-tone deck and hull

Priced from: $41,205

 

 

GENERAL

Type: Deep-vee family / fishing crossover

Material: GRP

Length: 5.05m (incl. bowsprit)

Beam: 2.13m

Weight (hull): Approx. 475kg

Weight (towing): Approx. 1120kg

Deadrise: 21-33°

 

 

CAPACITIES

Fuel: 100lt

People: 5

Min. rec. HP: 70

Max. rec. HP: 115

 

 

ENGINE

Make/model: Suzuki DF 90 A

Type: Four-stroke, DOHC, 16-valve

Displacement: 1502cc

Engine weight: 155kg (long shaft)

Gear ratio: 2.59:1

 

 

MANUFACTURED & SUPPLIED BY

The Haines Group

140 Viking Drive

Wacol, Qld, 4076

Tel: (07) 3271 4400

Web: www.thehainesgroup.com

 

 

 Originally published in TrailerBoat #268.

Words By Kevin Smith

http://www.tradeboats.com.au/trailerboat-reviews/boats/1105/signature-502rf-review/

 

Haines Signature 525RF - Boat Advice BACK


There’s no doubt that a well designed runabout with plenty of usable room is among the most versatile boats available. That’s precisely how I would describe Haines Signature’s 525RF. It’s aimed at the fishing family, offering a decent-size cockpit, plenty of comfort when and where it’s needed, and terrific all-round performance – all in all an easily towed and easily stored package. Signature offers three RF (Runabout Fishing) models in its range, all of which are configured in exactly the same way.

Like most Signatures these days, the 525RF is built on what the company calls its Variable Deadrise Hull, which kicks off at 33 degrees at the forefoot and tapers back to 21 degrees at the transom. It’s a concept that seems to work well in each series.

The Signature 525RF is a compact unit that works nicely with moderate power. It’s built with typical Signature precision and attention to detail, and the boat I tested certainly looked the part in gleaming white with contrasting black striping. Pacific Marine had fitted it out with a Honda BF100 four-stroke, which would prove to be the ideal match.

WHAT YOU GET

The 525RF is a handy size – big enough to take outside in reasonable weather when the kings or tuna are running, yet nimble enough to sneak around the lakes and estuaries when targeting bream or trout. It’s very much a cross-over style of craft, which seem to be quite popular around the country these days.

The 525RF carries maximum beam of 2.13m, the hull weighs around 750kg and it’s rated to carry a top load of 650kg. Recommended horsepower range is 70-115 (maximum engine weight 200kg) and the standard fuel capacity is 100 litres. Being a low profile unit, carport storage height is a very manageable 2.20m.

As seems to be the case with most popular runabouts these days, the Signature features a split dash and walk-through windscreen. This is handy for moving forward to pull the anchor if an electric winch isn’t fitted, and also for following a big, stubborn fish if you’re lucky enough to hook one. The helm console is neatly laid out and I found it extremely comfortable in the driver’s seat as we powered out into St Vincent’s Gulf during a lengthy test run.

There’s plenty of dry storage in the Signature 525RF, with lockers up forward, a deep storage bin in the port side of the dash, and a sizeable compartment beneath the cockpit floor. The cockpit is spacious enough to fish mum, dad and a couple of kids or maybe three adults in comfort. I like the transom set up, which uses a fold-down flap to enable engine tilting instead of an obtrusive outboard well. Maximising usable space is always a significant design criterion in compact trailer boats, and Signature has done this nicely.

A deep bait well is located in the starboard transom corner, while on the opposite side there’s a handy boarding gate. Fit an optional dive ladder directly beneath this gate and you have the most convenient way to climb into or out of the water.

Signature offers plenty of options when it comes to both hull and interior colour combinations. You can choose from 15 gelcoat base colours with contrasting decals and striping, six trim colours and 14 upholstery colour options. PreFixx upholstery protection is standard, making all surfaces resilient and immune to the effects of strong solvents and cleaners.

POWER

As mentioned, the Signature 525RF is rated to carry outboards between 70-115hp, which seems pretty reasonable. With a hull as obviously efficient as this one, you don’t need a massive engine to get it up and planing quickly, and I was very pleased with the decision to fit a new Honda BF100 four-stroke. This was to be my first experience with this engine and, as has invariably been the case with all Honda experiences to date, it proved to be a beauty.

The BF100 weighs a respectable 166kg, which is a tad lighter than Yamaha, considerably lighter than Suzuki, and comfortably under the maximum recommended transom weight of 200kg.

ON THE WATER

After seemingly incessant late winter storms, it was nice to be able to head out onto St Vincent’s Gulf, west of Adelaide, and enjoy a rare window of blue skies and flat seas for our Signature test run. So nice was the weather, in fact, that we threw in a couple of rods and some crab nets for use after the test and photo session had been completed. It’s a tough gig for sure, but I guess someone has to do it.

As expected, the Honda kicked into life with the first turn of the key and was immediately idling so smoothly and quietly, it was hard to tell whether it was running or not. You’ve really got to love these new generation four-strokes.

In these conditions outside North Haven Marina I was able to travel quickly in any direction – with quickly being the operative word. Top speed with two on board was (by the Garmin GPS) a spritely 38 knots (70km/h), and I was able to throttle back to 28 knots (52km/h) and 3900rpm to enjoy a comfortable, economical ride. Hole-shot performance was quite impressive too, which I attribute to a combination of hull and engine efficiency. I could see no reason at all to go for a bigger motor than the Honda BF100, even with skiing or tubing on the agenda.

This is indeed a responsive boat to drive, and a lot of fun on a day as nice as this one. We headed out on a long run toward the Outer Harbor channel’s Fairway beacon, around 10km offshore. With the entire Gulf mirror calm, it was naturally impossible to make comment on how the Signature 525RF rides in the rough. However, I anticipate that it would handle in pretty much the same way as its larger brethren, the 575RF and 600RF, both of which I’ve driven very comfortably through lumpy water.

Stability at rest in the Signature 525RF is pretty good for a craft with a relatively sharp deadrise aft. It’s no lightweight, of course, which always assists with stability, despite the positive buoyancy effects of a foam-filled hull. We dropped crab nets over the side and moved the weight around consistently without any noticeable listing, which is always good news for serious offshore anglers.

ON THE TRAILER

With a package towing weight of around 1250kg, the Signature 525RF sits easily within the capabilities of the average family sedan. The boat I tested was presented on a single axle Dunbier trailer, which appeared more than adequate for the job. I powered the boat off and back onto the trailer with ease (it’s always a snack with no cross wind to worry about), which anyone can do with a little practice.

With the tide well down, exposing a slippery boat ramp, it was handy to have a four-wheel drive tow vehicle for the task. However, a conventional vehicle would handle this package comfortably on a dry, slime-free surface.

OVERVIEW

As a cross-over package, the Signature 525RF/Honda BF100 combo is right up there with the best in its class. Versatility is its real strong suit, which is naturally significant in todays market. It’s a boat that will take you wide to fish the blue water when conditions are right, onto the river for a days family fishing, or out onto the lake for a skiing or tubing session if so desired.

Test boat supplied by Pacific Marine, Adelaide.

POSITIVES

  • Signature 525RF 4Absolute versatility
  • Terrific build and finish quality
  • Good measure of cockpit space
  • Ability to run well with moderate power

NEGATIVES

  • 100 litres of fuel may be a bit light for offshore work

NUMBERS THAT MATTER

  • Price: (as tested) $49,990
  • Construction: GRP
  • Length overall: 5.25m
  • Beam: 2.13m
  • Deadrise: Variable 21-33 degrees
  • Dry weight: 750kg
  • Towing weight: 1250kg
  • Recommended Power: 70-115hp
  • Engine fitted: 100hp Honda four-stroke
  • Maximum load: 650kg

Read the full review online: Boat Advice - Haines Signature 525RF review

 

Videos


Upholstery colours


Personalise your Siganture

Signature™ boats and Nautolex are proud to be associated with the PreFixx range of maritime seat vinyls - standard on all Signature™ models. Unsurpassed cleanability and wear from a marine seating fabric, PreFixx protection offers you the latest technology to remove stains that could never be removed before. With a test proven abrasion resistance, PreFixx protected products protect you from high maintenance costs and from frequent reupholstery costs. PreFixx protected Nautolex materials - cleanable with strong, active solvents without damage.

Primary Upholstery Colours
Secondary Upholstery Colours
Stitching Colours

Hull colours [Gellcoat]


Trim colours


Personalise your Siganture

Standard Cloth Trim Colours
Upgrade Colours
525RF

Optional Extras

Configurations

Specifications

Moulded length with bowsprit 5.25m
Length 5.25m
Beam 2.13m
Deadrise 21−33°
Fuel 100L
Water N/A
Berths Day
Power outboard 70−115HP
Transom height 25"
Max outboard weight 200kg
Hull weight approx. 750kg
Towing weight approx. 1,250kg
BMT length approx. 6.10m
BMT height approx. 2.20m
BMT width 2.13m
Max people 5/450kg
Max load 650kg

Haines Signature 525RF - Fishing World Review BACK

Big Ambitions - Haines Signiture 502RF

19 Jan 2012

Fishing World - October 2011

REVIEWED: HAINES SIGNATURE 502 RF

SCOTT THOMAS  checks out a small boat with a lot to offer for fishos seeking versatility – the new Haines Signature 502 RF.

FIVE metres doesn’t always equal a small  boat. Well, that’s what I was hoping as we followed The Haines Group’s larger Traveller TF 200 (see August 2011 Boat Fishing) out through the Gold Coast's  Seaway in search of a few snapper, or maybe a mack tuna or two. As it turned out, besides the surge through the Seaway, the seas were dead flat and heading  offshore in a smallish boat presented few issues. However, the Haines Group’s  new 502 RF does certainly seem to offer big boat performance in a small neat package.

Fishing World colleague Mick Fletoridis was onboard the Traveller with The Haines  Group’s Greg Haines and Nikki Winter. The Haines Group’s Stuart Smith was  onboard the 502RF with me. As Mick already outlined in August Boat  Fishing, the perfect conditions didn’t equate to perfect fishing and the swarms of mack tuna we saw the previous day had completely vanished. 

Even so, we tried trolling and dropping soft plastics down, which allowed for a decent appraisal of the boat’s fishability at sea. 

Runabout Fisherman
The Haines group offers three boat brands  in its line up with Traveller, Seafarer and Signature, with the latter the “prestige” brand for those wanting the best from a boat in performance and design. The “RF” refers to “Runabout Fisherman” with The Haines Group designing the new model with versatility in mind. The cabin has been brought forward to allow plenty of fishing deck space extending back to the transom. While this is a fishing magazine, a “family friendly” boat could mean the difference to  accessing those well guarded finances from the missus! Unlike many boat brands on the market, mostly imports, who try too hard to offer family and fishing  features, THG has left the 502’s simplicity, space, shelter and ride comfort as its main family friendly attributes. In other words, no giant lounges or  unnecessary add-on gadgets that get in the way of the real reason you bought the  boat: to go fishing. It’s a simple, yet practical boat with heaps of space for a  few mates to fish comfortably. 

The test boat featured a 90hp Suzuki A  series. The new A series 90 features Lean Burn technology, which according to  the brochures, offers great fuel savings by allowing the engine to run on a more efficient mixture through the use of a lean air-fuel ratio. Another handy feature of these outboards is tilt limiter, a simple, but handy feature which allows you to customise where the outboard will stop tilting and can save bait boards, etc, from getting squashed by a tilting motor. 

The transom has a door and step down ladder for making entering and exiting the boat much easier, on and off the water. 

The transom also features a roomy livewell which also doubled on test day as a ice box. For the family fisho, there’s a fold-down seat which tucks away nicely and would comfortably seat a couple people. There’s also a couple of useful Tallon mounts towards the transom. Tallon, which are fitted across The Haines Group boat ranges are a handy flush mount for attaching a range of accessories including drink holders, bait boards, lights, etc. It’s a great way Haines has kept the gunwales relatively clutter free while still offering a  choice of accessories when you need them. Under the gunwales there’s plenty of  space in the parcel shelves and a handy built-in fish measuring ruler nearby.

Good stability and a generous amount of freeboard adds to the boat’s  fishability and would lend itself to light offshore work chasing snapper, kings, etc. Of course, it would also be equally at home inside the estuary.

There’s ample space around the helm. Swivelling seats allow both driver and passengers to turn around and face the transom while fishing, if they wish. However, I  found the swivelling helm seat could easily knock the throttle. The test boat dash featured a Garmin 4515 sounder and gauges including fuel, tacho, speed, and trim/tilt. The dash had sufficient space on offer for more electronics or a larger  sounder unit.

Opposite the helm in front of the passenger seat there’s a deep glove box for putting valuables, which also doubles as an insulated ice box. For more storage, Haines has added a shallow storage bin under the floor between passenger and helm seats.

Further forward towards the bow, the walkthrough windscreen allows access to the anchor well and there's more storage inside the bow.

Smooth riding
The Haines Group’s Signature is the company’s premium brand and this 502 reflected the company’s promise in both ride and overall finish. It was a fun, sporty and dry boat to drive. Hard turns at speed  were too easy and good fun in the mild sea. The patented Signature Variable  Deadrise Hull goes from 21 to 33 degrees, which equates to a seriously smooth  ride and surprisingly good stability. Haines says its SVDH technology helps in lifting the boat onto the plane and keeps it there at lower speeds, which results in fuel savings at lower speeds. On the subject of speeds, the 90hp Suzuki gave a good account of itself with a comfortable cruising speed of 24  knots at 4500 RPM and WOT at 31 knots and 6000 RPM. The maximum power rating is 115hp if you’re looking for more speed. For a 5-metre boat, the 502RF really  gives a good account of itself.    ¦

Haines Signature 502RF 
Length: LOA 5.25m
Beam: 2.13m
Deadrise: 21-33  degrees
Weight: Approx. 475kg (hull only);towing approx. 1120kg
Power: Rec. 70-115hp
Price: From $41,205; as tested $48,601
Fit out: ****
Ride/Handling: *****
Performance: ****
Fishability: ****
Overall finish: ****
Value: ****
Overall: ****

 

Words By Scott Thomas
http://www.fishingworld.com.au/news/big-ambitions-haines-signiture-502rf 

Haines Signature 525RF - RedBook Review BACK

The new Signature 502RF might look unconventional, says Kevin Smith, but take a closer look and you'll see just how clever and original the design is.

LIKES
- Comfortable ride in rough conditions
- Higher gunwales in stern are a good child safety feature
- Moulded fish measurer in sidepocket
- Overall finish

DISLIKES
- Out of the hole performance in turns poor due to cavitation
- Hydraulic steering would be a good idea (it’s optional)
- Angle of dash unsuitable for flush-mounted sounders or GPS

OVERVIEW
- Distinctive features
They always say that change is as good as a holiday, and that definitely applies to the new Signature 502RF (Runabout Fisher), a boat with a unique design and distinctive colour scheme. Most manufacturers have to keep up to date with modern designs and trends of course, but every now and then something very different pops up. When these designs emerge they inevitably tend to raise eyebrows, but then they’re also quite refreshing.
So it is with the new Signature. But what’s so different about this particular boat?

Firstly, the 502RF has curvy lines extending from the bow, as you’d expect, but it then changes to a square cut-off in the stern -- without tapering or curving back towards the transom. That certainly looks different. However, when you take a closer look at the stern it makes sense, particularly when it comes to creating a bit of extra comfort, space, and safety. The gunwales in the stern are higher than usual without the taper, which is great because it’ll keep kids in, rather than out. The seating in the stern is also a tad more comfortable because the back rest is now higher than usual, and with this compact design, the additional space becomes more evident.

The second distinctive feature is a colour break in orange, which is certainly enough to create general interest in the boat. Even so, it’s not over the top as far as I’m concerned and the more I studied it the more I liked it.

LAYOUT AND ACCOMMODATION
- Clever touches
The balance of the internal layout has interesting features incorporated into this family-cum-fishing boat. Besides the compact stern there’s room for dual boarding platforms, a transom door, livewell/icebox, and a good size rear lounge that folds away neatly. Beneath this are the bilgepump, filter and battery.

The deck is speckled non-slip material with a carpeted centre section, there’s a stowage hatch, and the gunwales have built-in pockets with plenty of space to lock toes in underneath. Another simple but really nice feature is a fish measurer moulded into the side of the gunwale pocket, a far more practical idea than having to plaster those ugly stickers on the boat.

Yet another clever touch -- and one that makes a substantial difference -- is the beading around otherwise hard edges, plus some built-in lighting, as well as specialised multi-purpose fittings called Tallon receivers. These fittings are the base to a number of interchangeable accessories from drinkholders to rodholders and even lighting fixtures. They’re quite nifty (check out www.tallonsystems.com to see what I mean).

AT THE HELM
- Comfortable and quiet
Console seating comprises adjustable, dual-moulded swivel seats with cushion inserts that can be removed. The passenger side has a glovebox/icebox in the dash and there’s more storage space underneath, while the skipper’s side has a neat dash setup with a fair amount of space for smaller electronics.

Overall, it’s pretty comfortable, with clear vision through the wide wraparound screen. Between the two is a walkthrough section, which is fantastic for accessing the anchor hatch in the bow. The windscreen folds back and the bow opens up through a hinged door, creating access to the stowage beneath and on either side, as well as to the anchor hatch. In ideal conditions you could leave it all open for extra ventilation while in less perfect conditions you could close it for protection.

A simple bimini top for shade complements the console area. Another notable part of the design and layout is in the recessed handles and moulded non-slip material all the way through to the bow.

On the performance side, ride and general handling were real winners. Sporting a 90hp Suzuki four-stroke, the 502 had enough get up and go to suit a small family and could do double-duty as a boat for light skiing. There was an exceptionally smooth transition to the plane but personally I felt the 90 lacked a bit of bottom-end out of the hole. 

I reckon that with a 115, this boat would have the ideal setup.

Signature hulls have a unique feature in their "Variable Deadrise" design -- in this instance from 21 to 33 degrees. A flat plank design off the keel that tapers to the bow makes it easier for the hull to get on the plane and at the same time maximises fuel economy. The concave hull is yet another interesting part to the Signature range because (in addition to its many other benefits) it helps create a smooth and dry ride. We ran in a 15-knot wind over the current and I’d have to say that maintaining a speed of over 18kts (33km/h) in these conditions was quite impressive. The hull was even foam-filled, which, in addition to every other positive characteristic, made it nice and quiet.

We conducted our mandatory performance tests, including tight turns at high speeds and out of the hole acceleration. At high speed the 502RF sat firm with moderate cavitation while at lower speeds out of the hole and under full-lock the cavitation was more evident. This was due to the motor being set up slightly high, which is of course easy to change.

I spent a fair amount of time testing the Signature 502RF and I’d say it fits right into the family boating and fishing category. It has an interesting design and plenty of standard features that many other boats simply don’t offer. It has ample space, performs well, and is ready to go without you needing to spend a big fat wad. It’s definitely a value for money package.
   
Specifications:
Price as tested: $48,601
Options fitted: Battery, bimini with zips, carbon fibre dash, Garmin 4515, ladder, recessed cockpit lighting, Suzuki control cables and engine fitup, aft lounge folding seating, sports steering wheel, Tallon receivers, Dunbier trailer, transom step, two-tone deck and hull
Priced from: $41,205

General:
Type: Deep-vee family/fishing crossover
Material: GRP
Length: 5.05m (incl. bowsprit)
Beam: 2.13m
Weight (hull): Approx. 475kg
Weight (towing): Approx. 1120kg
Deadrise: 21-33 degrees
Fuel: 100lt
People: 5
Min. rec. HP: 70
Max. rec. HP: 115

Engine:
Make/model: Suzuki DF 90 A
Type: Four-stroke, DOHC, 16-valve
Displacement: 1502cc
Engine weight: 155kg (long shaft)
Gear ratio: 2.59:1

Supplied by:
The Haines Group
140 Viking Drive
Wacol, Qld, 4076
Tel: (07) 3271 4400
Web: www.thehainesgroup.com 


Review Supplied By Redbook.com.au
http://www.redbook.com.au/boat-reviews/2011/runabout/haines-signature/502-rf/haines-signature-502rf-26755?csn_tnet=true

Haines Signature 525RF - Trade Boats Review BACK

The new Signature 502RF (formerly Haines Signature) might look unconventional, says Kevin Smith, but take a closer look and you’ll see just how clever and original the design is.

 
SIGNATURE 502RF

TEST: SIGNATURE 502RF

They always say that change is as good as a holiday, and that definitely applies to the new Signature 502RF (Runabout Fisher), a boat with a unique design and distinctive colour scheme. Most manufacturers have to keep up to date with modern designs and trends of course, but every now and then something very different pops up. When these designs emerge they inevitably tend to raise eyebrows, but then they're also quite refreshing.

So it is with the new Signature. But what's so different about this particular boat?

Firstly, the 502RF has curvy lines extending from the bow, as you'd expect, but it then changes to a square cut-off in the stern - without tapering or curving back towards the transom. That certainly looks different. However, when you take a closer look at the stern it makes sense, particularly when it comes to creating a bit of extra comfort, space, and safety. The gunwales in the stern are higher than usual without the taper, which is great because it'll keep kids in, rather than out. The seating in the stern is also a tad more comfortable because the back rest is now higher than usual, and with this compact design, the additional space becomes more evident.

The second distinctive feature is a colour break in orange, which is certainly enough to create general interest in the boat. Even so, it's not over the top as far as I'm concerned and the more I studied it the more I liked it.

 

 

SMART LAYOUT

The balance of the internal layout has interesting features incorporated into this family-cum fishing boat. Besides the compact stern there's room for dual-boarding platforms, a transom door, livewell/icebox, and a good size rear lounge that folds away neatly. Beneath this are the bilgepump, filter and battery.

The deck is speckled non-slip material with a carpeted centre section, there's a stowage hatch, and the gunwales have built-in pockets with plenty of space to lock toes in underneath. Another simple but really nice feature is a fish measurer moulded into the side of the gunwale pocket, a far more practical idea than having to plaster those ugly stickers on the boat. Yet another clever touch - and one that makes a substantial difference - is the beading around otherwise hard edges, plus some built-in lighting, as well as specialised multi-purpose fittings called Tallon receivers. These fittings are the base to a number of interchangeable accessories from drinkholders to rodholders and even lighting fixtures. They're quite nifty (check out www.tallonsystems.com to see what I mean).

 

 

AT THE HELM

Console seating comprises adjustable, dual-moulded swivel seats with cushion inserts that can be removed. The passenger side has a glovebox/icebox in the dash, there's more storage space underneath, while the skipper's side has a neat dash setup with a fair amount of space for smaller electronics. Overall it's pretty comfortable, with clear vision through the wide wraparound screen. Between the two is a walkthrough section, which is fantastic for accessing the anchor hatch in the bow. The windscreen folds back and the bow opens up through a hinged door, creating access to the stowage beneath and on either side, as well as to the anchor hatch. In ideal conditions you could leave it all open for extra ventilation while in less perfect conditions you could close it for protection.

A simple bimini top for shade complements the console area. Another notable part of the design and layout is in the recessed handles and moulded non-slip material all the way through to the bow.

On the performance side, ride and general handling were real winners for me. Sporting a 90hp Suzuki four-stroke, the 502 had enough get up and go to suit a small family and could do double-duty as a boat for light skiing. There was an exceptionally smooth transition to the plane but personally I felt the 90 lacked a bit of bottom-end out of the hole.
I reckon that with a 115, this boat would have the ideal setup.

Signature hulls have a unique feature in their "Variable Deadrise" design - in this instance from 21° to 33°. A flat plank design off the keel that tapers to the bow makes it easier for the hull to get on the plane and at the same time maximises fuel economy. The concave hull is yet another interesting part to the Signature range because (in addition to its many other benefits) it helps create a smooth and dry ride. We ran in a 15-knot wind over the current and I'd have to say that maintaining a speed of over 18kts (33kmh) in these conditions was quite impressive. The hull was even foam-filled, which in addition to every other positive characteristic made it nice and quiet.

We conducted our mandatory performance tests, including tight turns at high speeds and out of the hole acceleration. At high speed the 502RF sat firm with moderate cavitation while at lower speeds out of the hole and under full-lock the cavitation was more evident. This was due to the motor being set up slightly high, which is of course easy to change.

 

 

THE WRAP

I spent a fair amount of time testing the Signature 502RF and I'd say it fits right into the family boating and fishing category. It has an interesting design and plenty of standard features that many other boats simply don't offer. It has ample space, performs well, and is ready to go without you needing to spend a big fat wad. It's definitely a value for money package.

 

 

 

 

 

Specifications: Signature 502RF

 

 

HOW MUCH?

Price as tested: $48,601

Options fitted: Battery, bimini with zips, carbon fibre dash, Garmin 4515, ladder, recessed cockpit lighting, Suzuki control cables and engine fitup, aft lounge folding seating, sports steering wheel, Tallon receivers, Dunbier trailer, transom step, two-tone deck and hull

Priced from: $41,205

 

 

GENERAL

Type: Deep-vee family / fishing crossover

Material: GRP

Length: 5.05m (incl. bowsprit)

Beam: 2.13m

Weight (hull): Approx. 475kg

Weight (towing): Approx. 1120kg

Deadrise: 21-33°

 

 

CAPACITIES

Fuel: 100lt

People: 5

Min. rec. HP: 70

Max. rec. HP: 115

 

 

ENGINE

Make/model: Suzuki DF 90 A

Type: Four-stroke, DOHC, 16-valve

Displacement: 1502cc

Engine weight: 155kg (long shaft)

Gear ratio: 2.59:1

 

 

MANUFACTURED & SUPPLIED BY

The Haines Group

140 Viking Drive

Wacol, Qld, 4076

Tel: (07) 3271 4400

Web: www.thehainesgroup.com

 

 

 Originally published in TrailerBoat #268.

Words By Kevin Smith

http://www.tradeboats.com.au/trailerboat-reviews/boats/1105/signature-502rf-review/

 

Haines Signature 525RF - Boat Advice BACK

There’s no doubt that a well designed runabout with plenty of usable room is among the most versatile boats available. That’s precisely how I would describe Haines Signature’s 525RF. It’s aimed at the fishing family, offering a decent-size cockpit, plenty of comfort when and where it’s needed, and terrific all-round performance – all in all an easily towed and easily stored package. Signature offers three RF (Runabout Fishing) models in its range, all of which are configured in exactly the same way.

Like most Signatures these days, the 525RF is built on what the company calls its Variable Deadrise Hull, which kicks off at 33 degrees at the forefoot and tapers back to 21 degrees at the transom. It’s a concept that seems to work well in each series.

The Signature 525RF is a compact unit that works nicely with moderate power. It’s built with typical Signature precision and attention to detail, and the boat I tested certainly looked the part in gleaming white with contrasting black striping. Pacific Marine had fitted it out with a Honda BF100 four-stroke, which would prove to be the ideal match.

WHAT YOU GET

The 525RF is a handy size – big enough to take outside in reasonable weather when the kings or tuna are running, yet nimble enough to sneak around the lakes and estuaries when targeting bream or trout. It’s very much a cross-over style of craft, which seem to be quite popular around the country these days.

The 525RF carries maximum beam of 2.13m, the hull weighs around 750kg and it’s rated to carry a top load of 650kg. Recommended horsepower range is 70-115 (maximum engine weight 200kg) and the standard fuel capacity is 100 litres. Being a low profile unit, carport storage height is a very manageable 2.20m.

As seems to be the case with most popular runabouts these days, the Signature features a split dash and walk-through windscreen. This is handy for moving forward to pull the anchor if an electric winch isn’t fitted, and also for following a big, stubborn fish if you’re lucky enough to hook one. The helm console is neatly laid out and I found it extremely comfortable in the driver’s seat as we powered out into St Vincent’s Gulf during a lengthy test run.

There’s plenty of dry storage in the Signature 525RF, with lockers up forward, a deep storage bin in the port side of the dash, and a sizeable compartment beneath the cockpit floor. The cockpit is spacious enough to fish mum, dad and a couple of kids or maybe three adults in comfort. I like the transom set up, which uses a fold-down flap to enable engine tilting instead of an obtrusive outboard well. Maximising usable space is always a significant design criterion in compact trailer boats, and Signature has done this nicely.

A deep bait well is located in the starboard transom corner, while on the opposite side there’s a handy boarding gate. Fit an optional dive ladder directly beneath this gate and you have the most convenient way to climb into or out of the water.

Signature offers plenty of options when it comes to both hull and interior colour combinations. You can choose from 15 gelcoat base colours with contrasting decals and striping, six trim colours and 14 upholstery colour options. PreFixx upholstery protection is standard, making all surfaces resilient and immune to the effects of strong solvents and cleaners.

POWER

As mentioned, the Signature 525RF is rated to carry outboards between 70-115hp, which seems pretty reasonable. With a hull as obviously efficient as this one, you don’t need a massive engine to get it up and planing quickly, and I was very pleased with the decision to fit a new Honda BF100 four-stroke. This was to be my first experience with this engine and, as has invariably been the case with all Honda experiences to date, it proved to be a beauty.

The BF100 weighs a respectable 166kg, which is a tad lighter than Yamaha, considerably lighter than Suzuki, and comfortably under the maximum recommended transom weight of 200kg.

ON THE WATER

After seemingly incessant late winter storms, it was nice to be able to head out onto St Vincent’s Gulf, west of Adelaide, and enjoy a rare window of blue skies and flat seas for our Signature test run. So nice was the weather, in fact, that we threw in a couple of rods and some crab nets for use after the test and photo session had been completed. It’s a tough gig for sure, but I guess someone has to do it.

As expected, the Honda kicked into life with the first turn of the key and was immediately idling so smoothly and quietly, it was hard to tell whether it was running or not. You’ve really got to love these new generation four-strokes.

In these conditions outside North Haven Marina I was able to travel quickly in any direction – with quickly being the operative word. Top speed with two on board was (by the Garmin GPS) a spritely 38 knots (70km/h), and I was able to throttle back to 28 knots (52km/h) and 3900rpm to enjoy a comfortable, economical ride. Hole-shot performance was quite impressive too, which I attribute to a combination of hull and engine efficiency. I could see no reason at all to go for a bigger motor than the Honda BF100, even with skiing or tubing on the agenda.

This is indeed a responsive boat to drive, and a lot of fun on a day as nice as this one. We headed out on a long run toward the Outer Harbor channel’s Fairway beacon, around 10km offshore. With the entire Gulf mirror calm, it was naturally impossible to make comment on how the Signature 525RF rides in the rough. However, I anticipate that it would handle in pretty much the same way as its larger brethren, the 575RF and 600RF, both of which I’ve driven very comfortably through lumpy water.

Stability at rest in the Signature 525RF is pretty good for a craft with a relatively sharp deadrise aft. It’s no lightweight, of course, which always assists with stability, despite the positive buoyancy effects of a foam-filled hull. We dropped crab nets over the side and moved the weight around consistently without any noticeable listing, which is always good news for serious offshore anglers.

ON THE TRAILER

With a package towing weight of around 1250kg, the Signature 525RF sits easily within the capabilities of the average family sedan. The boat I tested was presented on a single axle Dunbier trailer, which appeared more than adequate for the job. I powered the boat off and back onto the trailer with ease (it’s always a snack with no cross wind to worry about), which anyone can do with a little practice.

With the tide well down, exposing a slippery boat ramp, it was handy to have a four-wheel drive tow vehicle for the task. However, a conventional vehicle would handle this package comfortably on a dry, slime-free surface.

OVERVIEW

As a cross-over package, the Signature 525RF/Honda BF100 combo is right up there with the best in its class. Versatility is its real strong suit, which is naturally significant in todays market. It’s a boat that will take you wide to fish the blue water when conditions are right, onto the river for a days family fishing, or out onto the lake for a skiing or tubing session if so desired.

Test boat supplied by Pacific Marine, Adelaide.

POSITIVES

  • Signature 525RF 4Absolute versatility
  • Terrific build and finish quality
  • Good measure of cockpit space
  • Ability to run well with moderate power

NEGATIVES

  • 100 litres of fuel may be a bit light for offshore work

NUMBERS THAT MATTER

  • Price: (as tested) $49,990
  • Construction: GRP
  • Length overall: 5.25m
  • Beam: 2.13m
  • Deadrise: Variable 21-33 degrees
  • Dry weight: 750kg
  • Towing weight: 1250kg
  • Recommended Power: 70-115hp
  • Engine fitted: 100hp Honda four-stroke
  • Maximum load: 650kg

Read the full review online: Boat Advice - Haines Signature 525RF review

 

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