575F
  • NOW AVAILABLE with Enclosed Hard Top. Fitted with glass windscreen and built tough for all weather conditions
  • Huge usable cockpit area
  • Super soft, dry and stable ride
  • Tows behind a mid-size 4wd or larger passenger car
  • Unmatched stability at rest
  • A true offshore fishing machine
  • Large kill and bait tanks
  • Tackle boxes in moulded side pockets (Optional)
  • Fully moulded non-slip deck
  • Large moulded side pocket area
  • 180 litre fuel tank capacity
  • Optional side door
  • 7 people

Configurations


Take a Tour


Specifications


Length 5.70m
Beam 2.38m
Deadrise 21-33°
Fuel 180L
Berths 2
Outboard power (single) 115-175HP
Transom height 25"
Max outboard weight 240kg
Hull weight approx. 1,000kg
Towing weight (including fuel) approx. 1,900kg
BMT length approx. 7.12m
BMT height approx. 2.55m
BMT width approx. 2.38m
Max people 7/630kg
Max load 850kg

Haines Signature 575F - Boat Point Review BACK


New cuddy cabin breaks the fish-and-family-boat mould

LIKES- Protective cabin?- Ideal helm set up?- Folding bait-rigging station ?- Cockpit stowage ideal for busy anglers
NOT SO MUCH?- Needs passenger handrails?- Perhaps a handrail fitted on the inside of the windscreen 

OVERVIEW- More fishing space in an Australian-made sportfisherTo say we were more than a little keen to get onboard this new model from The Haines Group is an understatement! In a sea of trailerboat brands and builders, all spruiking their product’s user friendliness, the 575F stands out from the crowd. 
The cuddy-cabin version of the 575RF runabout we tested last year is a new iteration designed to appeal to the serious angler who: (a) covets a little more cabin space, (b) invests heavily in the latest electronics, and (c) places great emphasis on cockpit room for casting and wrestling fish. 
Thanks to a clever bimini design this a boat that has a surprising amount of casting room. It is therefore a great sportfishing platform for many fisheries around the country. From casting to GTs up north to bouncing soft-plastics for snapper to chasing King George whiting, the 575F will be a fit.
We also feel more than a little chuffed that this boat is built by Australian anglers for Australian anglers. That can only add to the 575F’s utility and useability, not to mention after-sales support and resale. 
Suffice to say, Haines Signature boats have a good reputation for standing the test of time. The new 575F builds on everything the yard has achieved before, while also setting some new standards in respect of design. 

PRICE AND EQUIPMENT- Plenty of standard kit and class-leading bait-prep stationThis Signature 575F comes with a respectable price tag of $76,290 with a host of factory fitted options included in that price.
The folding bait-preparation board is a ‘must have’ when ordering this boat. For too long, manufacturers have put this important fishing accessory on the ‘if you must’ list.?As a result, such ill-designed bait boards don’t always take into consideration the size and shape of the outboard cowl. The result being the meeting of the two with damage to one or both. 
But the R&D staff at The Haines Group has come up with this pearler of a bait-rigging station that has got more features than many we see. With hinged and pinned post supports, it folds down into the cockpit when required.
The transom step is a handy feature and must be fitted to get the boarding ladder, which is also optional. With it, you improve water access to make a better family and dive rig.
The stainless steel seat risers are another option, but again we see them as key components that allow for stowage of large items such as (and in this case) a pair of iceboxes. They were secured underneath the seats to prevent them sliding out onto the deck. 
The boxes protrude aft from the overhanging frame at a distance that will allow the ends to be used as seating, too. If one does not take this option, typical pedestal-post seating is the standard fit.
The brace of Garmin electronics was also optional and consisted of a 751S combination chartplotter and a pair of GM120 instruments that interface with the 140hp Suzuki. 
Those with driveway parking for their trailerboat might want to contemplate the optional sliding lock-up cabin door to secure their gear on board, as well as the canvas-covered bimini frame that includes a rocket launcher.
If you don’t want icing on your cake, the base boat will set you back $59,440. You still get a lot of boat for the price tag. But with the extra kit our test model was more fish-friendly.
LAYOUT AND ACCOMMODATION- Geared for serious fishing with heaps of storageSignatures have never been lacking in the stowage department and the 575F is no different. 
The boat has two-tier cockpit side-pockets that are part of the liner. The lower level will accept medium-sized rigged fishing rods, while their fascias are made of King Starboard, a tough synthetic material impervious to most things. 
The fronts of these side pockets are engraved with a long measuring board to help you keep your catch legal and alleviate the need for messy and untidy boat stickers.
Complementing the side pockets is a pair of hatches in which to stow a pair of common Plano tackle trays to keep gear neat and dry. Imagine having a stack of these home in the shed, loaded with the right sort of tackle for the target species of the day, and just adding and subtracting as needed. Way to go!
The transom has a half-height walkthrough with Kingboard door that leads out onto the boarding platform, fitted with a transom step and ladder.
Meanwhile, the rear lounge rebates flush with the front of the transom bulkhead and the padded backrests provides ample cushioning for the thighs when leaning outboard to fight a fish.
The livebait tank is situated in the starboard transom corner and nearby is that smart bait-rigging station we like so much. The latter has a hinged cutting board covering a shallow rebate suitable for traces and small rigged game lures. 
Another rebate for the plumbed sink drains over the back. There are dedicated areas to hold hooks and the knife in a safe manner. The few drink holders will be put to good use retaining anything else likely to roll around when on the high seas.
A big kill tank is situated in the deck between the two helm seats and it doubles as another icebox or perhaps a rubbish receptacle.
But the most noticeable design aspect is the height of the cuddy superstructure and helm station bulkhead. Higher than just about any other trailerboat, it will prove agreeable to all but the shortest of anglers, while offering great protection when underway and high headroom inside the cabin.
The 575F features an opening centre pane in the toughened-glass windscreen that may be accessed by standing on a sturdy metal fold-down step fitted to the bulkhead.
The helm station is a hinged unit that may be released with the panel opening to reveal the looms and hydraulic pump for the wheel. All of the electrical components are easily accessed rather than having to crawl around in the confines of the cabin. 
The interesting feature of this newly heightened bulkhead is the angle at which the helm-station panel faces the wheel. It is designed so that anglers in the cockpit may easily view instruments including the sounder and chartplotter. That makes it perfect for presenting lures to those targets on the sounder. 
It is for this reason that the helm wheel has been positioned low on the panel so the fish-finding screen (up to a 15-inch model) is not obscured by helm wheel spokes and the like.
Adding to the fishability of the cockpit is the way the bimini frame has been shortened to allow people to wave long rods about without clashing with the metal work. An optional pullout awning increases shade should you want it.
Inside the cabin are the typical under-bench bunk stowage voids and there is easy access to the anchor well through a roof hatch. There is a portable toilet installed in the leg well otherwise covered with infill cushions. 
The lack of bulk behind the dash has freed up the cabin nicely and, in our view, a set of stowage pockets would be a practical addition.
MECHANICAL AND HULL- Great foundation and reputationThe helm on the 575F is hydraulic. The hull is what we typically see with Signature boats: full one-piece topsides adhered to a full one-piece hull. The voids in between are filled with waterproof high-density foam which aids rigidity, deadens a lot of ambient through-hull noise and turns any underdeck compartments into insulated compartments should you need to utilise more icebox space. 
The only timber used in the construction of the hull is Ruply which is made specifically for The Haines Group to strengthen the transom. Having used this material for 16 years without structural issues, they are on the right track.
ON THE WATER- Flat seas but we sniff the potentialA cracker day on Moreton Bay did nothing to help test the seagoing ability of the 575F, so we made enough waves to prove that it will ride well over short sharp chop. The 140hp Suzuki is an economical match to this hull and it produced a good hole shot with pleasing results in the fuel consumption department.
At pelagic-trolling speed of 6 knots, the engine was turning over at 2600rpm with a fuel consumption of 8.8lph. The Suzuki settled into a comfortable cruise speed of 22.8 knots at 4250rpm for a fuel burn of 24.0 ph. WOT was 5600rpm burning 42lph for a speed of 32 knots, which indicates a smaller propeller is needed to get the rpm up to that recommended by the manufacturer. 
Considering this review was this boat’s water trial after rolling off the production line and straight into the Brisbane Boat Show, it did well to perform to the level it did.
At the end of the day, it’s good to see a manufacturer not afraid to make significant design changes to the cosmetics of a cuddy cabin. This boat will find favour with ardent lure fishers and family boaters. It has a lot to offer the wider on-water community out there. 
Towable with a mid-range 4WD or a large family sedan, the 575F has broad appeal and is well suited to many applications from fishing to purely pleasure boating. Definitely worth a second look.

RATINGS Overall rating: 4.78/5.0

Mechanical/equipment: 4.8/5.0

Packaging and practicality: 4.9/5.0

On the water Performance: 4.8/5.0

Value for money: 4.8/5.0

X-factor: 4.6/5.0


Specifications Priced from: base boat $59,440.

LOA: 5.95m

Beam: 2.38m

Weight: 1900kg

tow weight

Engine: 140 hp Suzuki 4-stroke

Deadrise: 21-33 degrees variable

Fuel: 220ltr

Berths: 2People

Day: 7

Reveiw supplied by www.boatpoint.com.au
http://www.boatpoint.com.au/content/reviews/2013/cuddy---half-cabin/haines-signature/575f/haines-signature-575f-38918 

Haines Signature 575F - RedBook Review BACK


New cuddy cabin breaks the fish-and-family-boat mouldLIKES- Protective cabin?- Ideal helm set up?- Folding bait-rigging station ?- Cockpit stowage ideal for busy anglers
NOT SO MUCH?- Needs passenger handrails?- Perhaps a handrail fitted on the inside of the windscreen OVERVIEW- More fishing space in an Australian-made sportfisherTo say we were more than a little keen to get onboard this new model from The Haines Group is an understatement! In a sea of trailerboat brands and builders, all spruiking their product’s user friendliness, the 575F stands out from the crowd. 
The cuddy-cabin version of the 575RF runabout we tested last year is a new iteration designed to appeal to the serious angler who: (a) covets a little more cabin space, (b) invests heavily in the latest electronics, and (c) places great emphasis on cockpit room for casting and wrestling fish. 
Thanks to a clever bimini design this a boat that has a surprising amount of casting room. It is therefore a great sportfishing platform for many fisheries around the country. From casting to GTs up north to bouncing soft-plastics for snapper to chasing King George whiting, the 575F will be a fit.
We also feel more than a little chuffed that this boat is built by Australian anglers for Australian anglers. That can only add to the 575F’s utility and useability, not to mention after-sales support and resale. 
Suffice to say, Haines Signature boats have a good reputation for standing the test of time. The new 575F builds on everything the yard has achieved before, while also setting some new standards in respect of design. PRICE AND EQUIPMENT- Plenty of standard kit and class-leading bait-prep stationThis Signature 575F comes with a respectable price tag of $76,290 with a host of factory fitted options included in that price.
The folding bait-preparation board is a ‘must have’ when ordering this boat. For too long, manufacturers have put this important fishing accessory on the ‘if you must’ list.?As a result, such ill-designed bait boards don’t always take into consideration the size and shape of the outboard cowl. The result being the meeting of the two with damage to one or both. 
But the R&D staff at The Haines Group has come up with this pearler of a bait-rigging station that has got more features than many we see. With hinged and pinned post supports, it folds down into the cockpit when required.
The transom step is a handy feature and must be fitted to get the boarding ladder, which is also optional. With it, you improve water access to make a better family and dive rig.
The stainless steel seat risers are another option, but again we see them as key components that allow for stowage of large items such as (and in this case) a pair of iceboxes. They were secured underneath the seats to prevent them sliding out onto the deck. 
The boxes protrude aft from the overhanging frame at a distance that will allow the ends to be used as seating, too. If one does not take this option, typical pedestal-post seating is the standard fit.
The brace of Garmin electronics was also optional and consisted of a 751S combination chartplotter and a pair of GM120 instruments that interface with the 140hp Suzuki. 
Those with driveway parking for their trailerboat might want to contemplate the optional sliding lock-up cabin door to secure their gear on board, as well as the canvas-covered bimini frame that includes a rocket launcher.
If you don’t want icing on your cake, the base boat will set you back $59,440. You still get a lot of boat for the price tag. But with the extra kit our test model was more fish-friendly.
LAYOUT AND ACCOMMODATION- Geared for serious fishing with heaps of storageSignatures have never been lacking in the stowage department and the 575F is no different. 
The boat has two-tier cockpit side-pockets that are part of the liner. The lower level will accept medium-sized rigged fishing rods, while their fascias are made of King Starboard, a tough synthetic material impervious to most things. 
The fronts of these side pockets are engraved with a long measuring board to help you keep your catch legal and alleviate the need for messy and untidy boat stickers.
Complementing the side pockets is a pair of hatches in which to stow a pair of common Plano tackle trays to keep gear neat and dry. Imagine having a stack of these home in the shed, loaded with the right sort of tackle for the target species of the day, and just adding and subtracting as needed. Way to go!
The transom has a half-height walkthrough with Kingboard door that leads out onto the boarding platform, fitted with a transom step and ladder.
Meanwhile, the rear lounge rebates flush with the front of the transom bulkhead and the padded backrests provides ample cushioning for the thighs when leaning outboard to fight a fish.
The livebait tank is situated in the starboard transom corner and nearby is that smart bait-rigging station we like so much. The latter has a hinged cutting board covering a shallow rebate suitable for traces and small rigged game lures. 
Another rebate for the plumbed sink drains over the back. There are dedicated areas to hold hooks and the knife in a safe manner. The few drink holders will be put to good use retaining anything else likely to roll around when on the high seas.
A big kill tank is situated in the deck between the two helm seats and it doubles as another icebox or perhaps a rubbish receptacle.
But the most noticeable design aspect is the height of the cuddy superstructure and helm station bulkhead. Higher than just about any other trailerboat, it will prove agreeable to all but the shortest of anglers, while offering great protection when underway and high headroom inside the cabin.
The 575F features an opening centre pane in the toughened-glass windscreen that may be accessed by standing on a sturdy metal fold-down step fitted to the bulkhead.
The helm station is a hinged unit that may be released with the panel opening to reveal the looms and hydraulic pump for the wheel. All of the electrical components are easily accessed rather than having to crawl around in the confines of the cabin. 
The interesting feature of this newly heightened bulkhead is the angle at which the helm-station panel faces the wheel. It is designed so that anglers in the cockpit may easily view instruments including the sounder and chartplotter. That makes it perfect for presenting lures to those targets on the sounder. 
It is for this reason that the helm wheel has been positioned low on the panel so the fish-finding screen (up to a 15-inch model) is not obscured by helm wheel spokes and the like.
Adding to the fishability of the cockpit is the way the bimini frame has been shortened to allow people to wave long rods about without clashing with the metal work. An optional pullout awning increases shade should you want it.
Inside the cabin are the typical under-bench bunk stowage voids and there is easy access to the anchor well through a roof hatch. There is a portable toilet installed in the leg well otherwise covered with infill cushions. 
The lack of bulk behind the dash has freed up the cabin nicely and, in our view, a set of stowage pockets would be a practical addition.
MECHANICAL AND HULL- Great foundation and reputationThe helm on the 575F is hydraulic. The hull is what we typically see with Signature boats: full one-piece topsides adhered to a full one-piece hull. The voids in between are filled with waterproof high-density foam which aids rigidity, deadens a lot of ambient through-hull noise and turns any underdeck compartments into insulated compartments should you need to utilise more icebox space. 
The only timber used in the construction of the hull is Ruply which is made specifically for The Haines Group to strengthen the transom. Having used this material for 16 years without structural issues, they are on the right track.
ON THE WATER- Flat seas but we sniff the potentialA cracker day on Moreton Bay did nothing to help test the seagoing ability of the 575F, so we made enough waves to prove that it will ride well over short sharp chop. The 140hp Suzuki is an economical match to this hull and it produced a good hole shot with pleasing results in the fuel consumption department.
At pelagic-trolling speed of 6 knots, the engine was turning over at 2600rpm with a fuel consumption of 8.8lph. The Suzuki settled into a comfortable cruise speed of 22.8 knots at 4250rpm for a fuel burn of 24.0 ph. WOT was 5600rpm burning 42lph for a speed of 32 knots, which indicates a smaller propeller is needed to get the rpm up to that recommended by the manufacturer. 
Considering this review was this boat’s water trial after rolling off the production line and straight into the Brisbane Boat Show, it did well to perform to the level it did.
At the end of the day, it’s good to see a manufacturer not afraid to make significant design changes to the cosmetics of a cuddy cabin. This boat will find favour with ardent lure fishers and family boaters. It has a lot to offer the wider on-water community out there. 
Towable with a mid-range 4WD or a large family sedan, the 575F has broad appeal and is well suited to many applications from fishing to purely pleasure boating. Definitely worth a second look.
RATINGSOverall rating: 4.78/5.0Mechanical/equipment: 4.8/5.0Packaging and practicality: 4.9/5.0On the water Performance: 4.8/5.0Value for money: 4.8/5.0X-factor: 4.6/5.0
SpecificationsPrice as tested: $76,290Priced from: base boat $59,440.LOA: 5.95mBeam: 2.38mWeight: 1900kg tow weightEngine: 140 hp Suzuki 4-strokeDeadrise: 21-33 degrees variableFuel: 220ltrBerths: 2People Day: 7 Supplied by:The Haines Group of Companieswww.thehainesgroup.com

words by Rick Huckstepp
http://www.redbook.com.au/boat-reviews/2013/cuddy---half-cabin/haines-signature/575f/haines-signature-575f-38918?csn_tnet=true 

Haines Signature 575F - Trade Boat BACK


The original Signature 575F rewrote the book on compact offshore capable sportfishers. Does this reinterpreted version live up to the legend?

 
Haines Signature 575F

When Signature originally released its 575F around two decades ago, it immediately resonated with anglers everywhere. Compact enough to be towed behind a big family sedan or wagon, but very economical to run, even back when four-strokes were still trying to get a toehold in the Aussie market, it found a receptive fishing audience.

More than that, a slinky profile and compact cabin, capped off by a swept-back curved windscreen, meant it looked different to other fishing boats of its era. But not just a looker, it could also go toe-to-toe with the big boys beyond the horizon.

The original 575F proved versatility and fishability were not mutually exclusive, and now its successor has hit the market.

To be fair, the new 575F is the second in a series of boats based on the same platform, the first of which was the low-profile 575RF, released almost a year ago. The new model offers a significantly taller stance with more cabin volume, which should better shed breaking water.

Internally, the revised cabin affords more head height, shelter and an improved driving position. The new 575F’s fishing cockpit is similar to the 575RF and is deep and spacious, capable of fishing up to four in comfort.

We’re anxiously waiting for the call to get it out on the water and bring TrailerBoat readers the exclusive story. Stay tuned.

SIGNATURE 575F SPECIFICATIONS
Material: Fibreglass
Length: 5.95m 
Beam: 2.38m
Max HP: 175
Weight: 1900kg (BMT) 
Fuel: 220lt
Capacity: 7

 

Review Supplied by www.tradeboats.com.au

 

http://www.tradeboats.com.au/trailerboat-news/boating/1309/haines-signature-575f/

Originally published in TrailerBoat #297, July 2013

Haines Signature 575F - Boat Advice BACK


The Haines Signature ‘F’ (Fishing) range now offers 14 models varying between 4.85m and 6.50m. They are aimed at serious anglers and, as such, are fitted out comprehensively to suit a plethora of Aussie fishing situations. I’ve ridden in most of Signature’s ‘F’ boats and have always been impressed by the way they are presented and, most importantly, by the way they perform in difficult conditions.
The Signature 575F sits about mid-range, and it’s definitely among the more versatile models in the ‘F’ series. It’s big enough for some serious offshore work, yet easy to tow behind the average family sedan or mid-sized SUV. It is also a handsome rig to look at.

WHAT YOU GET
The 575 is best described as a fishing all rounder, as it will be at home on the reefs chasing snapper, out on the blue water trolling for tuna, or tucked up somewhere in an estuary system chasing bream or flathead. The ratio of cabin to cockpit seems about right in this model, but the same hull is also offered in runabout configuration for those who are looking for reduced accommodation and a little extra fishing room.
I like the way the transom is laid out, with decent sized live bait tank on the starboard side, a boarding gate to port and provision above the motor well for a large, removable bait table. The table included in the test boat was among the best I’ve seen, with separate covered compartments for bait, terminal tackle and knives. This has to be removed prior to tilting the motor for trailering, but it’s definitely worth the slight inconvenience. An upholstered rear lounge is included, which can be folded up in the blink of an eye for total transom access.

A handy storage locker is set in the cockpit floor between the helm and passenger’s seats, which could be used as a fish bin if so desired. Directly aft of that is a 220-litre fuel tank that will provide a handy operating range with today’s crop of four-stroke outboards. The Signature’s swiveling bucket seats are about as comfortable as you’d want, with tasteful upholstery to match hull graphics. There are literally dozens of upholstery colour combinations to choose from.
The helm station is stylish and neat, looking very impressive in graphite contrasting against white. Gauges sit along the top of the console, with plenty of room directly beneath for a large display combination GPS/sounder unit. Steering wheel and accessories toggle switches are set at precisely the right level for operators of average stature.
The sliding cabin door, another smart inclusion, is lockable and provides optimum privacy for overnighting. There’s a small, but handy glove compartment set in the dash on the passenger’s side, as well as a sturdy grab rail for bumpy days. A five-piece wrap around windscreen provides excellent all-round vision, and the optional bimini top keeps the elements at bay nicely. Interestingly, the 575RF is also available with a hard top, which is definitely worth exploring if you have ample home storage height.

As is the case across the Haines Signature range, this model carries high quality fittings throughout. Deck hardware is sturdy and well positioned, with split bow rail, recessed cleats and Reelax anchor fitting up front.
Pacific Marine in Adelaide is currently offering the 575F/Honda BF150 package, which includes stainless propeller, 12-inch Simrad GPS/sounder, deluxe bait board, chemical toilet and offshore safety kit, for $82,990.

POWER
Haines signature quotes a recommended horsepower spread of 115-175 for the 575F hull, so the150 Honda four-stroke, as tested, sits exactly mid-range. From what I could ascertain during the test run, this is close to the ideal power match, providing ample acceleration and more than useful top speed.

With a 220-litre fuel tank you will have a decent safe operating range with the BF150, although a little more might come in handy while running well offshore in pursuit of tuna or billfish.

ON THE WATER
It was one of those early February mornings that looked threatening from the outset; it was muggy and overcast as we slipped the Signature in at Adelaide’s North Haven Marina, with a building northerly wind. Forecasters had predicted a gusty north-westerly change to roll in before lunch time, bringing with it a likely 15mm of rain, so there was precious little time to lose if I wanted to grab the pictures needed for this report.
Things were already quite blustery out on the Gulf as we motored out through the heads. White caps were starting to kick up, and it was obvious that conditions were set to get a whole lot worse as the day wore on.
With the Honda BF150 on the back the Signature was up and out of the hole in double quick time. This is a sweet engine that provides plenty of torque and clean, crisp acceleration, which is exactly what this unique hull really enjoys. Fortunately, with the wind in the north I was able to find a substantial stretch of protected water, where a top speed of just over 40 knots (75km/h) was achieved at 5700rpm. Dropping back to 4000 revs produced around 29 knots (54km/h) and a more sedate, and economical, cruise of 25 knots (46km/h) came at around 3600rpm.

Nudging out beyond the shelter of the Outer Harbor breakwater brought a whole new set of sea conditions. The wind had freshened to around 20 knots and was gradually swinging to the north-west, which was certain to make things a lot more interesting.
The 575F’s variable dead rise hull, which starts out at 33 degrees up front and tapers off to 21 degrees at the transom, is extremely capable in a decent chop. We powered southward for quite a distance before turning to run back out toward the horizon, and in both directions the Signature delivered a positive, predictable ride. It likes plenty of out trim while running with the sea, and I was able to pull the leg well out before any cavitation was experienced.
However, it’s while running back into a head sea that the Signature hull really shines. With the leg tucked well in, we turned back to the north-west and I gradually pushed the revs up to around 3000. As expected, the 575 handled a metre of head sea with consummate ease. Spray was thrown well clear and re-entry was about as soft as you could reasonably expect in these conditions. There’s no doubt this is an extremely capable boat, and one you could rely on to get you home comfortably on a less than friendly day.

ON THE TRAILER
Pacific Marine offers Signature boats on SA-built trailers constructed from C-section steel. The test boat came on a dual axle, multi-roller trailer that proved highly efficient during both drive off and drive back on. C-section construction is certainly a good idea, as it enables residual salt water to drain away and evaporate far quicker than water trapped within rectangular section steel.
With an all up highway weight of around 1900kg, the Signature package would be a snack to tow. Naturally, multi-axle configuration makes this job a whole lot safer and easier on the driver.

OVERVIEW
The 575F is one of my personal favourites from Haines Signature. I like its versatility, particularly in a fishing sense, and I can easily understand why it is becoming one of the brand’s most popular rigs. The Honda 150, as tested, provides exceptional fuel economy, and you get plenty of standard features in this package that are optional extras in some opposition rigs.

POSITIVES
Terrific head sea ride, courtesy of the variable dead rise hull
Excellent level of fit out
Great versatility for varied fishing situations

NEGATIVES
Having to remove the bait table to fully tilt the outboard

NUMBERS THAT MATTER
Price: (as tested) $82,990.
Construction: GRP
Length: 5.70m
Beam: 2.38m
Deadrise: Variable 33-21 degrees
Fuel capacity: 220 litres
Towing weight: 1900kg
Maximum HP: 175
Motor Fitted: Honda BF150
Maximum load: 850kg

Review By Shane Mensforth

http://www.boatadvice.com.au/haines-signature-575f-review/

Videos


Upholstery colours


Personalise your Siganture

Signature™ boats and Nautolex are proud to be associated with the PreFixx range of maritime seat vinyls - standard on all Signature™ models. Unsurpassed cleanability and wear from a marine seating fabric, PreFixx protection offers you the latest technology to remove stains that could never be removed before. With a test proven abrasion resistance, PreFixx protected products protect you from high maintenance costs and from frequent reupholstery costs. PreFixx protected Nautolex materials - cleanable with strong, active solvents without damage.

Primary Upholstery Colours
Secondary Upholstery Colours
Stitching Colours

Hull colours [Gellcoat]


Trim colours


Personalise your Siganture

Standard Cloth Trim Colours
Upgrade Colours
575F

Optional Extras

Configurations

Specifications

Length 5.70m
Beam 2.38m
Deadrise 21-33°
Fuel 180L
Berths 2
Outboard power (single) 115-175HP
Transom height 25"
Max outboard weight 240kg
Hull weight approx. 1,000kg
Towing weight (including fuel) approx. 1,900kg
BMT length approx. 7.12m
BMT height approx. 2.55m
BMT width approx. 2.38m
Max people 7/630kg
Max load 850kg

Haines Signature 575F - Boat Point Review BACK

New cuddy cabin breaks the fish-and-family-boat mould

LIKES- Protective cabin?- Ideal helm set up?- Folding bait-rigging station ?- Cockpit stowage ideal for busy anglers
NOT SO MUCH?- Needs passenger handrails?- Perhaps a handrail fitted on the inside of the windscreen 

OVERVIEW- More fishing space in an Australian-made sportfisherTo say we were more than a little keen to get onboard this new model from The Haines Group is an understatement! In a sea of trailerboat brands and builders, all spruiking their product’s user friendliness, the 575F stands out from the crowd. 
The cuddy-cabin version of the 575RF runabout we tested last year is a new iteration designed to appeal to the serious angler who: (a) covets a little more cabin space, (b) invests heavily in the latest electronics, and (c) places great emphasis on cockpit room for casting and wrestling fish. 
Thanks to a clever bimini design this a boat that has a surprising amount of casting room. It is therefore a great sportfishing platform for many fisheries around the country. From casting to GTs up north to bouncing soft-plastics for snapper to chasing King George whiting, the 575F will be a fit.
We also feel more than a little chuffed that this boat is built by Australian anglers for Australian anglers. That can only add to the 575F’s utility and useability, not to mention after-sales support and resale. 
Suffice to say, Haines Signature boats have a good reputation for standing the test of time. The new 575F builds on everything the yard has achieved before, while also setting some new standards in respect of design. 

PRICE AND EQUIPMENT- Plenty of standard kit and class-leading bait-prep stationThis Signature 575F comes with a respectable price tag of $76,290 with a host of factory fitted options included in that price.
The folding bait-preparation board is a ‘must have’ when ordering this boat. For too long, manufacturers have put this important fishing accessory on the ‘if you must’ list.?As a result, such ill-designed bait boards don’t always take into consideration the size and shape of the outboard cowl. The result being the meeting of the two with damage to one or both. 
But the R&D staff at The Haines Group has come up with this pearler of a bait-rigging station that has got more features than many we see. With hinged and pinned post supports, it folds down into the cockpit when required.
The transom step is a handy feature and must be fitted to get the boarding ladder, which is also optional. With it, you improve water access to make a better family and dive rig.
The stainless steel seat risers are another option, but again we see them as key components that allow for stowage of large items such as (and in this case) a pair of iceboxes. They were secured underneath the seats to prevent them sliding out onto the deck. 
The boxes protrude aft from the overhanging frame at a distance that will allow the ends to be used as seating, too. If one does not take this option, typical pedestal-post seating is the standard fit.
The brace of Garmin electronics was also optional and consisted of a 751S combination chartplotter and a pair of GM120 instruments that interface with the 140hp Suzuki. 
Those with driveway parking for their trailerboat might want to contemplate the optional sliding lock-up cabin door to secure their gear on board, as well as the canvas-covered bimini frame that includes a rocket launcher.
If you don’t want icing on your cake, the base boat will set you back $59,440. You still get a lot of boat for the price tag. But with the extra kit our test model was more fish-friendly.
LAYOUT AND ACCOMMODATION- Geared for serious fishing with heaps of storageSignatures have never been lacking in the stowage department and the 575F is no different. 
The boat has two-tier cockpit side-pockets that are part of the liner. The lower level will accept medium-sized rigged fishing rods, while their fascias are made of King Starboard, a tough synthetic material impervious to most things. 
The fronts of these side pockets are engraved with a long measuring board to help you keep your catch legal and alleviate the need for messy and untidy boat stickers.
Complementing the side pockets is a pair of hatches in which to stow a pair of common Plano tackle trays to keep gear neat and dry. Imagine having a stack of these home in the shed, loaded with the right sort of tackle for the target species of the day, and just adding and subtracting as needed. Way to go!
The transom has a half-height walkthrough with Kingboard door that leads out onto the boarding platform, fitted with a transom step and ladder.
Meanwhile, the rear lounge rebates flush with the front of the transom bulkhead and the padded backrests provides ample cushioning for the thighs when leaning outboard to fight a fish.
The livebait tank is situated in the starboard transom corner and nearby is that smart bait-rigging station we like so much. The latter has a hinged cutting board covering a shallow rebate suitable for traces and small rigged game lures. 
Another rebate for the plumbed sink drains over the back. There are dedicated areas to hold hooks and the knife in a safe manner. The few drink holders will be put to good use retaining anything else likely to roll around when on the high seas.
A big kill tank is situated in the deck between the two helm seats and it doubles as another icebox or perhaps a rubbish receptacle.
But the most noticeable design aspect is the height of the cuddy superstructure and helm station bulkhead. Higher than just about any other trailerboat, it will prove agreeable to all but the shortest of anglers, while offering great protection when underway and high headroom inside the cabin.
The 575F features an opening centre pane in the toughened-glass windscreen that may be accessed by standing on a sturdy metal fold-down step fitted to the bulkhead.
The helm station is a hinged unit that may be released with the panel opening to reveal the looms and hydraulic pump for the wheel. All of the electrical components are easily accessed rather than having to crawl around in the confines of the cabin. 
The interesting feature of this newly heightened bulkhead is the angle at which the helm-station panel faces the wheel. It is designed so that anglers in the cockpit may easily view instruments including the sounder and chartplotter. That makes it perfect for presenting lures to those targets on the sounder. 
It is for this reason that the helm wheel has been positioned low on the panel so the fish-finding screen (up to a 15-inch model) is not obscured by helm wheel spokes and the like.
Adding to the fishability of the cockpit is the way the bimini frame has been shortened to allow people to wave long rods about without clashing with the metal work. An optional pullout awning increases shade should you want it.
Inside the cabin are the typical under-bench bunk stowage voids and there is easy access to the anchor well through a roof hatch. There is a portable toilet installed in the leg well otherwise covered with infill cushions. 
The lack of bulk behind the dash has freed up the cabin nicely and, in our view, a set of stowage pockets would be a practical addition.
MECHANICAL AND HULL- Great foundation and reputationThe helm on the 575F is hydraulic. The hull is what we typically see with Signature boats: full one-piece topsides adhered to a full one-piece hull. The voids in between are filled with waterproof high-density foam which aids rigidity, deadens a lot of ambient through-hull noise and turns any underdeck compartments into insulated compartments should you need to utilise more icebox space. 
The only timber used in the construction of the hull is Ruply which is made specifically for The Haines Group to strengthen the transom. Having used this material for 16 years without structural issues, they are on the right track.
ON THE WATER- Flat seas but we sniff the potentialA cracker day on Moreton Bay did nothing to help test the seagoing ability of the 575F, so we made enough waves to prove that it will ride well over short sharp chop. The 140hp Suzuki is an economical match to this hull and it produced a good hole shot with pleasing results in the fuel consumption department.
At pelagic-trolling speed of 6 knots, the engine was turning over at 2600rpm with a fuel consumption of 8.8lph. The Suzuki settled into a comfortable cruise speed of 22.8 knots at 4250rpm for a fuel burn of 24.0 ph. WOT was 5600rpm burning 42lph for a speed of 32 knots, which indicates a smaller propeller is needed to get the rpm up to that recommended by the manufacturer. 
Considering this review was this boat’s water trial after rolling off the production line and straight into the Brisbane Boat Show, it did well to perform to the level it did.
At the end of the day, it’s good to see a manufacturer not afraid to make significant design changes to the cosmetics of a cuddy cabin. This boat will find favour with ardent lure fishers and family boaters. It has a lot to offer the wider on-water community out there. 
Towable with a mid-range 4WD or a large family sedan, the 575F has broad appeal and is well suited to many applications from fishing to purely pleasure boating. Definitely worth a second look.

RATINGS Overall rating: 4.78/5.0

Mechanical/equipment: 4.8/5.0

Packaging and practicality: 4.9/5.0

On the water Performance: 4.8/5.0

Value for money: 4.8/5.0

X-factor: 4.6/5.0


Specifications Priced from: base boat $59,440.

LOA: 5.95m

Beam: 2.38m

Weight: 1900kg

tow weight

Engine: 140 hp Suzuki 4-stroke

Deadrise: 21-33 degrees variable

Fuel: 220ltr

Berths: 2People

Day: 7

Reveiw supplied by www.boatpoint.com.au
http://www.boatpoint.com.au/content/reviews/2013/cuddy---half-cabin/haines-signature/575f/haines-signature-575f-38918 

Haines Signature 575F - RedBook Review BACK

New cuddy cabin breaks the fish-and-family-boat mouldLIKES- Protective cabin?- Ideal helm set up?- Folding bait-rigging station ?- Cockpit stowage ideal for busy anglers
NOT SO MUCH?- Needs passenger handrails?- Perhaps a handrail fitted on the inside of the windscreen OVERVIEW- More fishing space in an Australian-made sportfisherTo say we were more than a little keen to get onboard this new model from The Haines Group is an understatement! In a sea of trailerboat brands and builders, all spruiking their product’s user friendliness, the 575F stands out from the crowd. 
The cuddy-cabin version of the 575RF runabout we tested last year is a new iteration designed to appeal to the serious angler who: (a) covets a little more cabin space, (b) invests heavily in the latest electronics, and (c) places great emphasis on cockpit room for casting and wrestling fish. 
Thanks to a clever bimini design this a boat that has a surprising amount of casting room. It is therefore a great sportfishing platform for many fisheries around the country. From casting to GTs up north to bouncing soft-plastics for snapper to chasing King George whiting, the 575F will be a fit.
We also feel more than a little chuffed that this boat is built by Australian anglers for Australian anglers. That can only add to the 575F’s utility and useability, not to mention after-sales support and resale. 
Suffice to say, Haines Signature boats have a good reputation for standing the test of time. The new 575F builds on everything the yard has achieved before, while also setting some new standards in respect of design. PRICE AND EQUIPMENT- Plenty of standard kit and class-leading bait-prep stationThis Signature 575F comes with a respectable price tag of $76,290 with a host of factory fitted options included in that price.
The folding bait-preparation board is a ‘must have’ when ordering this boat. For too long, manufacturers have put this important fishing accessory on the ‘if you must’ list.?As a result, such ill-designed bait boards don’t always take into consideration the size and shape of the outboard cowl. The result being the meeting of the two with damage to one or both. 
But the R&D staff at The Haines Group has come up with this pearler of a bait-rigging station that has got more features than many we see. With hinged and pinned post supports, it folds down into the cockpit when required.
The transom step is a handy feature and must be fitted to get the boarding ladder, which is also optional. With it, you improve water access to make a better family and dive rig.
The stainless steel seat risers are another option, but again we see them as key components that allow for stowage of large items such as (and in this case) a pair of iceboxes. They were secured underneath the seats to prevent them sliding out onto the deck. 
The boxes protrude aft from the overhanging frame at a distance that will allow the ends to be used as seating, too. If one does not take this option, typical pedestal-post seating is the standard fit.
The brace of Garmin electronics was also optional and consisted of a 751S combination chartplotter and a pair of GM120 instruments that interface with the 140hp Suzuki. 
Those with driveway parking for their trailerboat might want to contemplate the optional sliding lock-up cabin door to secure their gear on board, as well as the canvas-covered bimini frame that includes a rocket launcher.
If you don’t want icing on your cake, the base boat will set you back $59,440. You still get a lot of boat for the price tag. But with the extra kit our test model was more fish-friendly.
LAYOUT AND ACCOMMODATION- Geared for serious fishing with heaps of storageSignatures have never been lacking in the stowage department and the 575F is no different. 
The boat has two-tier cockpit side-pockets that are part of the liner. The lower level will accept medium-sized rigged fishing rods, while their fascias are made of King Starboard, a tough synthetic material impervious to most things. 
The fronts of these side pockets are engraved with a long measuring board to help you keep your catch legal and alleviate the need for messy and untidy boat stickers.
Complementing the side pockets is a pair of hatches in which to stow a pair of common Plano tackle trays to keep gear neat and dry. Imagine having a stack of these home in the shed, loaded with the right sort of tackle for the target species of the day, and just adding and subtracting as needed. Way to go!
The transom has a half-height walkthrough with Kingboard door that leads out onto the boarding platform, fitted with a transom step and ladder.
Meanwhile, the rear lounge rebates flush with the front of the transom bulkhead and the padded backrests provides ample cushioning for the thighs when leaning outboard to fight a fish.
The livebait tank is situated in the starboard transom corner and nearby is that smart bait-rigging station we like so much. The latter has a hinged cutting board covering a shallow rebate suitable for traces and small rigged game lures. 
Another rebate for the plumbed sink drains over the back. There are dedicated areas to hold hooks and the knife in a safe manner. The few drink holders will be put to good use retaining anything else likely to roll around when on the high seas.
A big kill tank is situated in the deck between the two helm seats and it doubles as another icebox or perhaps a rubbish receptacle.
But the most noticeable design aspect is the height of the cuddy superstructure and helm station bulkhead. Higher than just about any other trailerboat, it will prove agreeable to all but the shortest of anglers, while offering great protection when underway and high headroom inside the cabin.
The 575F features an opening centre pane in the toughened-glass windscreen that may be accessed by standing on a sturdy metal fold-down step fitted to the bulkhead.
The helm station is a hinged unit that may be released with the panel opening to reveal the looms and hydraulic pump for the wheel. All of the electrical components are easily accessed rather than having to crawl around in the confines of the cabin. 
The interesting feature of this newly heightened bulkhead is the angle at which the helm-station panel faces the wheel. It is designed so that anglers in the cockpit may easily view instruments including the sounder and chartplotter. That makes it perfect for presenting lures to those targets on the sounder. 
It is for this reason that the helm wheel has been positioned low on the panel so the fish-finding screen (up to a 15-inch model) is not obscured by helm wheel spokes and the like.
Adding to the fishability of the cockpit is the way the bimini frame has been shortened to allow people to wave long rods about without clashing with the metal work. An optional pullout awning increases shade should you want it.
Inside the cabin are the typical under-bench bunk stowage voids and there is easy access to the anchor well through a roof hatch. There is a portable toilet installed in the leg well otherwise covered with infill cushions. 
The lack of bulk behind the dash has freed up the cabin nicely and, in our view, a set of stowage pockets would be a practical addition.
MECHANICAL AND HULL- Great foundation and reputationThe helm on the 575F is hydraulic. The hull is what we typically see with Signature boats: full one-piece topsides adhered to a full one-piece hull. The voids in between are filled with waterproof high-density foam which aids rigidity, deadens a lot of ambient through-hull noise and turns any underdeck compartments into insulated compartments should you need to utilise more icebox space. 
The only timber used in the construction of the hull is Ruply which is made specifically for The Haines Group to strengthen the transom. Having used this material for 16 years without structural issues, they are on the right track.
ON THE WATER- Flat seas but we sniff the potentialA cracker day on Moreton Bay did nothing to help test the seagoing ability of the 575F, so we made enough waves to prove that it will ride well over short sharp chop. The 140hp Suzuki is an economical match to this hull and it produced a good hole shot with pleasing results in the fuel consumption department.
At pelagic-trolling speed of 6 knots, the engine was turning over at 2600rpm with a fuel consumption of 8.8lph. The Suzuki settled into a comfortable cruise speed of 22.8 knots at 4250rpm for a fuel burn of 24.0 ph. WOT was 5600rpm burning 42lph for a speed of 32 knots, which indicates a smaller propeller is needed to get the rpm up to that recommended by the manufacturer. 
Considering this review was this boat’s water trial after rolling off the production line and straight into the Brisbane Boat Show, it did well to perform to the level it did.
At the end of the day, it’s good to see a manufacturer not afraid to make significant design changes to the cosmetics of a cuddy cabin. This boat will find favour with ardent lure fishers and family boaters. It has a lot to offer the wider on-water community out there. 
Towable with a mid-range 4WD or a large family sedan, the 575F has broad appeal and is well suited to many applications from fishing to purely pleasure boating. Definitely worth a second look.
RATINGSOverall rating: 4.78/5.0Mechanical/equipment: 4.8/5.0Packaging and practicality: 4.9/5.0On the water Performance: 4.8/5.0Value for money: 4.8/5.0X-factor: 4.6/5.0
SpecificationsPrice as tested: $76,290Priced from: base boat $59,440.LOA: 5.95mBeam: 2.38mWeight: 1900kg tow weightEngine: 140 hp Suzuki 4-strokeDeadrise: 21-33 degrees variableFuel: 220ltrBerths: 2People Day: 7 Supplied by:The Haines Group of Companieswww.thehainesgroup.com

words by Rick Huckstepp
http://www.redbook.com.au/boat-reviews/2013/cuddy---half-cabin/haines-signature/575f/haines-signature-575f-38918?csn_tnet=true 

Haines Signature 575F - Trade Boat BACK

The original Signature 575F rewrote the book on compact offshore capable sportfishers. Does this reinterpreted version live up to the legend?

 
Haines Signature 575F

When Signature originally released its 575F around two decades ago, it immediately resonated with anglers everywhere. Compact enough to be towed behind a big family sedan or wagon, but very economical to run, even back when four-strokes were still trying to get a toehold in the Aussie market, it found a receptive fishing audience.

More than that, a slinky profile and compact cabin, capped off by a swept-back curved windscreen, meant it looked different to other fishing boats of its era. But not just a looker, it could also go toe-to-toe with the big boys beyond the horizon.

The original 575F proved versatility and fishability were not mutually exclusive, and now its successor has hit the market.

To be fair, the new 575F is the second in a series of boats based on the same platform, the first of which was the low-profile 575RF, released almost a year ago. The new model offers a significantly taller stance with more cabin volume, which should better shed breaking water.

Internally, the revised cabin affords more head height, shelter and an improved driving position. The new 575F’s fishing cockpit is similar to the 575RF and is deep and spacious, capable of fishing up to four in comfort.

We’re anxiously waiting for the call to get it out on the water and bring TrailerBoat readers the exclusive story. Stay tuned.

SIGNATURE 575F SPECIFICATIONS
Material: Fibreglass
Length: 5.95m 
Beam: 2.38m
Max HP: 175
Weight: 1900kg (BMT) 
Fuel: 220lt
Capacity: 7

 

Review Supplied by www.tradeboats.com.au

 

http://www.tradeboats.com.au/trailerboat-news/boating/1309/haines-signature-575f/

Originally published in TrailerBoat #297, July 2013

Haines Signature 575F - Boat Advice BACK

The Haines Signature ‘F’ (Fishing) range now offers 14 models varying between 4.85m and 6.50m. They are aimed at serious anglers and, as such, are fitted out comprehensively to suit a plethora of Aussie fishing situations. I’ve ridden in most of Signature’s ‘F’ boats and have always been impressed by the way they are presented and, most importantly, by the way they perform in difficult conditions.
The Signature 575F sits about mid-range, and it’s definitely among the more versatile models in the ‘F’ series. It’s big enough for some serious offshore work, yet easy to tow behind the average family sedan or mid-sized SUV. It is also a handsome rig to look at.

WHAT YOU GET
The 575 is best described as a fishing all rounder, as it will be at home on the reefs chasing snapper, out on the blue water trolling for tuna, or tucked up somewhere in an estuary system chasing bream or flathead. The ratio of cabin to cockpit seems about right in this model, but the same hull is also offered in runabout configuration for those who are looking for reduced accommodation and a little extra fishing room.
I like the way the transom is laid out, with decent sized live bait tank on the starboard side, a boarding gate to port and provision above the motor well for a large, removable bait table. The table included in the test boat was among the best I’ve seen, with separate covered compartments for bait, terminal tackle and knives. This has to be removed prior to tilting the motor for trailering, but it’s definitely worth the slight inconvenience. An upholstered rear lounge is included, which can be folded up in the blink of an eye for total transom access.

A handy storage locker is set in the cockpit floor between the helm and passenger’s seats, which could be used as a fish bin if so desired. Directly aft of that is a 220-litre fuel tank that will provide a handy operating range with today’s crop of four-stroke outboards. The Signature’s swiveling bucket seats are about as comfortable as you’d want, with tasteful upholstery to match hull graphics. There are literally dozens of upholstery colour combinations to choose from.
The helm station is stylish and neat, looking very impressive in graphite contrasting against white. Gauges sit along the top of the console, with plenty of room directly beneath for a large display combination GPS/sounder unit. Steering wheel and accessories toggle switches are set at precisely the right level for operators of average stature.
The sliding cabin door, another smart inclusion, is lockable and provides optimum privacy for overnighting. There’s a small, but handy glove compartment set in the dash on the passenger’s side, as well as a sturdy grab rail for bumpy days. A five-piece wrap around windscreen provides excellent all-round vision, and the optional bimini top keeps the elements at bay nicely. Interestingly, the 575RF is also available with a hard top, which is definitely worth exploring if you have ample home storage height.

As is the case across the Haines Signature range, this model carries high quality fittings throughout. Deck hardware is sturdy and well positioned, with split bow rail, recessed cleats and Reelax anchor fitting up front.
Pacific Marine in Adelaide is currently offering the 575F/Honda BF150 package, which includes stainless propeller, 12-inch Simrad GPS/sounder, deluxe bait board, chemical toilet and offshore safety kit, for $82,990.

POWER
Haines signature quotes a recommended horsepower spread of 115-175 for the 575F hull, so the150 Honda four-stroke, as tested, sits exactly mid-range. From what I could ascertain during the test run, this is close to the ideal power match, providing ample acceleration and more than useful top speed.

With a 220-litre fuel tank you will have a decent safe operating range with the BF150, although a little more might come in handy while running well offshore in pursuit of tuna or billfish.

ON THE WATER
It was one of those early February mornings that looked threatening from the outset; it was muggy and overcast as we slipped the Signature in at Adelaide’s North Haven Marina, with a building northerly wind. Forecasters had predicted a gusty north-westerly change to roll in before lunch time, bringing with it a likely 15mm of rain, so there was precious little time to lose if I wanted to grab the pictures needed for this report.
Things were already quite blustery out on the Gulf as we motored out through the heads. White caps were starting to kick up, and it was obvious that conditions were set to get a whole lot worse as the day wore on.
With the Honda BF150 on the back the Signature was up and out of the hole in double quick time. This is a sweet engine that provides plenty of torque and clean, crisp acceleration, which is exactly what this unique hull really enjoys. Fortunately, with the wind in the north I was able to find a substantial stretch of protected water, where a top speed of just over 40 knots (75km/h) was achieved at 5700rpm. Dropping back to 4000 revs produced around 29 knots (54km/h) and a more sedate, and economical, cruise of 25 knots (46km/h) came at around 3600rpm.

Nudging out beyond the shelter of the Outer Harbor breakwater brought a whole new set of sea conditions. The wind had freshened to around 20 knots and was gradually swinging to the north-west, which was certain to make things a lot more interesting.
The 575F’s variable dead rise hull, which starts out at 33 degrees up front and tapers off to 21 degrees at the transom, is extremely capable in a decent chop. We powered southward for quite a distance before turning to run back out toward the horizon, and in both directions the Signature delivered a positive, predictable ride. It likes plenty of out trim while running with the sea, and I was able to pull the leg well out before any cavitation was experienced.
However, it’s while running back into a head sea that the Signature hull really shines. With the leg tucked well in, we turned back to the north-west and I gradually pushed the revs up to around 3000. As expected, the 575 handled a metre of head sea with consummate ease. Spray was thrown well clear and re-entry was about as soft as you could reasonably expect in these conditions. There’s no doubt this is an extremely capable boat, and one you could rely on to get you home comfortably on a less than friendly day.

ON THE TRAILER
Pacific Marine offers Signature boats on SA-built trailers constructed from C-section steel. The test boat came on a dual axle, multi-roller trailer that proved highly efficient during both drive off and drive back on. C-section construction is certainly a good idea, as it enables residual salt water to drain away and evaporate far quicker than water trapped within rectangular section steel.
With an all up highway weight of around 1900kg, the Signature package would be a snack to tow. Naturally, multi-axle configuration makes this job a whole lot safer and easier on the driver.

OVERVIEW
The 575F is one of my personal favourites from Haines Signature. I like its versatility, particularly in a fishing sense, and I can easily understand why it is becoming one of the brand’s most popular rigs. The Honda 150, as tested, provides exceptional fuel economy, and you get plenty of standard features in this package that are optional extras in some opposition rigs.

POSITIVES
Terrific head sea ride, courtesy of the variable dead rise hull
Excellent level of fit out
Great versatility for varied fishing situations

NEGATIVES
Having to remove the bait table to fully tilt the outboard

NUMBERS THAT MATTER
Price: (as tested) $82,990.
Construction: GRP
Length: 5.70m
Beam: 2.38m
Deadrise: Variable 33-21 degrees
Fuel capacity: 220 litres
Towing weight: 1900kg
Maximum HP: 175
Motor Fitted: Honda BF150
Maximum load: 850kg

Review By Shane Mensforth

http://www.boatadvice.com.au/haines-signature-575f-review/

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