575RF
  • Huge usable cockpit area
  • Super soft, dry and stable ride
  • Tows behind a mid-size 4wd or larger passenger car
  • Unmatched stability at rest
  • A true offshore fishing machine
  • Large kill and bait tanks
  • Tackle boxes in moulded side pockets (Optional)
  • Fully moulded non-slip deck
  • Large moulded side pocket area
  • 180 litre fuel tank capacity
  • Optional side door
  • 7 people

Configurations


Take a Tour


Specifications


Mouled length with bowsprit 5.95m
Length 5.70m
Beam 2.38m
Deadrise 21−33°
Fuel 180L
Water N/A
Berths 2
Power outboard 115−175HP
Transom height 25"
Max outboard weight 240kg
Hull weight approx. 1,000kg
Towing weight approx. 1,900kg
BMT length approx. 7.12m
BMT height approx. 2.25m
BMT width approx. 2.38m
Max people 7/630kg
Max load 870kg

Haines Signature 575RF - Fishing World BACK


Haines Signature 575RF

01 Mar 2013

Fishing World - February 2013

Haines Signature’s 575RF is the first to feature the company’s new generation hull. As Scott Thomas finds out, fishing is a big part of the new boat’s design.

The Haines family has been making boats for more than 50 years, and in that time the Signature brand has deservedly built up a reputation for producing some top-notch boats. The Queensland-based boat builder announced the first of its new generation Signature hulls at last year’s Sydney International Boat Show, releasing the 575RF tested here.

According to the company, the 575RF is the first of more to come.

The 575RF and its new generation hull is the first new design since company founder John Haines Snr passed away in 2009. It’s also the first of what look to be more specialised fishing orientated boats, which is great news if you’re a serious offshore fisho in the market for a premium boat. Haines Signature has also signed up well-known TV presenter Paul Worsteling and will release a larger “signature” model featuring input from the TV show host.  

The new generation hull features the Signature Variable Deadrise (SVDH) concept. The hull is a completely new design over previous hull shapes. Not that there was anything wrong with the existing Signature hulls, of course! The new hull features a slightly sharper entry and a 21-degree deadrise. The front keel section has a redesigned step down, which Signature put in place to direct the spray coming forward from the wide plank back down at the water. Towards the transom, Signature has designed “built-in trim tabs” for slower planing speeds and to assist in attaining good fuel economy. These “tabs” are also handy for cruising around and trolling lures at slow speeds.

Fishing

While the hull itself has been given a major make-over, so has the overall layout, with a notable design trend towards fishing applications. The transom has been shortened to create more cockpit space and a portside transom door has been added to allow easy access on and off the boat. The rear lounge is very sturdy and folds down easily for additional space when the fishing action heats up. There’s also a handy netted section at the rear to stash leaders and other odds and ends.

Under each gunwale is an optional side box insert with side pocket storage and tackle trays. There’s also a useful fish measuring ruler, which may seem gimmicky, but it sure beats the old faded yellow sticker. The side box is a worthwhile optional extra. According to Haines, all customers so far have gone with this option.

Rod holders are positioned on the gunwale and can be customised to suit the individual fisho. There’s also a rod rocket launcher above the targa roof.

Under the floor sits a 220 litre poly fuel tank as standard. Haines Signature says the longevity of this material means it will outlast other fuel tank materials such as alloy and or stainless and doesn’t sweat as much. Sweating can cause moisture and that’s bad news for outboards. 

Further towards the bow there’s also a 200 litre capacity underfloor kill tank suitable for storing larger fish. There are two lids and they can be fully removed for easier access to remove the catch. The kill tank drains back to the auto bilge at the transom.

The business end

The helm area features two comfortable seats and there’s plenty of storage and space for essentials such as EPIRBs, VHF radio, stereos and so on in a handy recessed section.

The dash featured a 12-inch Garmin 5012 running a GSD24 black box and 1kW transducer.

This area would allow a 15 inch screen to be fitted with the help of a packer. With more and more fishos taking electronics very seriously, and spending big dollars on quality units, it’s good to see companies such as Haines Signature taking notice and designing boats with this in mind. 

The test boat also featured two Garmin GMI 10 units installed in place of traditional engine gauges. They’re not essential when the same data can be viewed on the main sounder unit, but for the convenience of not swapping screens, they’re a good idea.

The test boat also had fitted an Autotether which is basically a wireless auto kill switch that the skipper wears.

This handy device will cut the engine if the skipper goes overboard and can locate crew who also happen to go overboard.

The cabin bunk area has been shortened, now allowing space for storage. This boat has been designed for fishing and unnecessarily long bunks just impinge on valuable fishing space.

There was plenty of storage, however, and the test boat also featured a Porta Potti. Access to the bow is simple with a folding hatch allowing unimpeded access without having to crawl through a small hatch. The test boat didn’t feature an anchor winch, however, Signature has a couple of different winches on offer and it would make sense to have one installed.

On the water

The boat test day followed on from Haines Suzuki’s DF140A outboard launch. The Haines Group chose the new 575RF to be used as a camera boat for a bunch of media shooting photos of the new outboard. The new 140 was being tested on the smaller Signature 543F.

It was a good opportunity to sample the 575’s stability in testing conditions and with a few heavy blokes on board. Overall  stability was good and while we weren’t fishing, I have no doubt fishing three or four on board would present no problems whatsoever in reasonably rough sea conditions.

The stiff north-easterly persisted the following day and Queensland’s Moreton Bay is no place for an ill-equipped boat. Thankfully, the 575RF is far from that and the bay’s short steep chop provided a great testing ground for the new generation hull.

The boat remained nice and dry, despite steep chop, and the ride was comfortable. We cruised through the rougher water at about 18 knots and 3500 RPM. Back in the calmer water a comfortable and fuel-efficient cruising speed was 25 knots and 4200 RPM with a fuel reading of 0.6 litre per kilometer. The boat’s top speed was 38 knots at 6000RPM.
The 575 also featured optional trim tabs which also helped keep us level while travelling across the choppy bay. 

The 575RF is rated to a maximum 175hp. Signature fitted a Suzuki 175hp four stroke to the test boat, which was more than adequate with excellent acceleration and top end speed. Someone looking to save a few dollars could probably opt for the new DF140A and still have a very capable fishing boat with plenty of power.

With a wide range of options, a new fishing friendly design and an impressive hull, Haines Signature’s new generation of boats could be just the thing for offshore fishos in the market for a premium Aussie-made offshore sportfisher.

Scott Thomas

Fact Box

Length: 5.7m 
Beam: 2.38m 
Deadrise: 21-38 degrees 
HULL WEIGHT: 1000kg 
MAX HP: 175hp 
Price: From $64,999; as tested $86,874  
Contacts: Signatureboats.com.au

Words by Scott Thomas

Review Supplied By Fishing World
http://www.fishingworld.com.au/news/haines-signature-575rf

Haines Signature 575RF - Fishing Monthly Group BACK


DOWNLOAD TEST DATA

The Haines Signature 575RF fishing runabout is the Haines Group’s first all-new hull design since the passing in 2009 of ‘Senior’, the late John Haines OAM.

The Haines Group’s CEO, John Haines, has carried on his father’s tradition but has imprinted his own signature on the 575RF design with a finer bow entry, a small kicker or keel step just aft of the waterline contact point plus other hull changes.

Released last August, the design features plenty of cockpit fishing space and a relatively small cuddy suited for a sit-down or somewhere for the kids to sleep.

The 575 RF is a real angler’s boat yet the cuddy still offers dry storage, overhead shelving and space for a portable toilet. Access to the bow is simple, just swing out the windscreen centre section and the cuddy hatch. The anchor locker has a pad for an electric winch.

The 575 RF has a one-piece interior Nexus Liner, which is bonded to the hull and increases hull strength by up to 30% while allowing very easy clean-up after a busy day on the water.

The hull-motor package remains quite light, around 1900kg including fuel, allowing for ease of towing with a six-cylinder wagon or sedan.

In typical Haines Signature fashion, the test 575RF was impeccably finished and presented. Heritage shows here: this company has been making Signatures for almost 30 years, with refinement following refinement.

MEANT TO FISH

The test 575 RF came equipped with almost every bell and whistle available and a forest of rods bristled from the folding stainless bimini’s six holders. The full-height transom has a well-sealed door to port and when stepping aboard from the jetty, my feet remained dry – nice.

The Signature’s natty removable transom bait station comes with holders for drinks, rods, knife and pliers, a decent cutting board and a sink with a pressure tap.

The three-person rapid drop-down aft seat stows flat against the transom for active fishing and there’s easy access to the plumbed live-bait well in the starboard corner. Cockpit drainage is via an underfloor sump and pump.

The cockpit is loaded with features. A plumbed 200L fish box with dual lids sits in the floor just aft of skipper’s and mate’s pedestal seats and would handle even the most ambitious of catches.

The gunwales have recessed grab rails, there are two rod holders per side and 2.36m long side pockets have toe space below. A deck wash resides in the port pocket.

Tackle trays stack in the aft sides and a moulded-in tape measure is set along the port side pocket.

Above the port upper pocket are switches for the house battery, engine battery and there’s an emergency parallel switch as back-up.

There is LED lighting in the cockpit.

The heavy-duty forward seats slide and swivel and while seated the passenger has within reach a large side pocket and the insulated and drained glovebox, which doubles as an icebox for drinks and snacks. Naturally there is a passenger grab rail and a footrest.

HELM SHOWPIECE

The helm is a Haines Signature showpiece with twin Garmin GMI 10 multi-function gauges above a Garmin GPS Map 5012 screen.

The three-spoke wheel has switches, engine key and the side-mounted Suzuki controls within easy reach of the skipper, along with the marine radio and sound system. The skipper also has a footrest.

This 575RF had an Autotether man overboard wireless motor shut-off system which does away with the ubiquitous red lanyard – more smart technology.

PERFORMANCE

The 2867cc V6 Suzuki 175hp was almost silent at idle and the 575RF planed away with three aboard at an amazingly low 7.3 knots (13.6kmh) at 2700 rpm. One could troll skirts at that speed in calm conditions and save a lot of fuel in the process. Likewise, in choppy going that slow plane would avoid a lot of throttle jockeying.

At 3000rpm the Garmin recorded 12.7 knots (23.6kmh) and at 4000rpm 23 knots (42.8kmh). At 5000rpm we were doing 31 knots (57.3kmh) and at 6000rpm a blistering 40 knots (74.4kmh). I see 4000rpm and 23 knots as a smart way to travel.

Performance was certainly lively and a real strong point. As we cruised into a 15-knot south-east breeze, input from the Bennett trim tabs became useful but it was a very dry and trouble-free ride all round. The bow sliced through chop cleanly, the plank under the hull and large reversed chines kept the Signature Variable Deadrise Hull perfectly on track.

At rest, given the relative lightness of the 5.7m hull, I was pleased to note little tendency whatsoever to lean.

As a specialised fishing craft, every desirable feature can be found in the Haines Signature 575RF. It’s strong, very well made and built to last – there’s a 10-year structural hull warranty.

The fish box, live-bait well and storage areas are large enough to be useful and the metre-high cockpit sides make this is one very safe offshore craft.

Driven sensibly, the 175hp Suzuki would return excellent fuel consumption although I would also consider 140hp power, so readily does this hull perform. And with 222L of fuel under the floor, there’d be a lot of cruising range.

The 575RF continues to show that those at the Haines Group pride themselves on turning out a top-quality product which sets standards for a lot of other Australian manufacturers.

On a Dunbier tandem trailer the test rig costs $78,000. To locate your nearest dealer call the Haines Group on 07 3271 4400 or visitwww.thehainesgroup.com.au .

SPECIFICATIONS

Hull length5.70m
Beam 2.38 m.
Length on trailer 7.10m
Height on trailer 2.0m to top of windscreen
Hull weight 1000kg
Deadrise 21°-33° variable
Fuel 222L
Capacity 7 adults
Power 140hp-175hp
Towing 4WD or large six-cylinder

 

Words By Wayne Kempe
http://www.fishingmonthly.com.au/Articles/Display/14166-New-Signature-same-flourish 

Haines Signature 575RF - RedBook Review BACK


Has the Haines Group really 'broken the mould' with this all-new hull?

HIGHS
- Great Australian build quality
- Abundant cockpit space
- Boatload of integrated fishing features and storage
- High freeboard ups safety factor
- Long-range fuel tank
- Frugal with super-slippery hull

LOWS
- Batteries need boxes/weather protection
- Protector/cover needed over dash wiring
- High-lift hull is a tad flighty with 175
- We copped the odd splash of the spray

OVERVIEW
- First new boat in years breaks mould
Everything about our impending test of the Signature 575RF was new: the boat, the outboard, the fishing gear, the latest king-prawn imitation soft-plastic lures, Sydney’s first offshore artificial reef, the 12in colour Garmin touchscreen showing us the way and, soon, to the fish to be caught asunder.

In fact, the all-new Signature 575RF is the Haines Group’s first completely new boat since the passing of company founder and boating legend John Haines Senior in 2009. You could say it’s been a long time coming, but good things come to those who wait and, we hoped, wet a line.

Slotting comfortably between the company’s popular 543RF and 600RF, the 575RF features a completely new take on the company’s variable-deadrise hull. It looks unconventional head on, as revealed in our previous news story.

We’ll get to our on-water impressions, meantime, a line or two from the revered Gold Coast yard.

 "We feel we have achieved the perfect combination of performance through the water under power and stability at rest, developing arguably the most stable fishing platform ever," John Haines Junior told Boatsales and BoatPoint during the new Signature’s official unveiling at the Sydney International Boat Show on August 2.

"Not only does the 575RF boast the most stable platform but also the largest for its size, while still remaining comfortably within legal towing limits," he added. Indeed, the all-up towing weight of 1900kg (including fuel) means the 575RF isn’t a handful to lug, launch and retrieve with a modest four-wheeler or family wagon.

Meantime, The RF or Runabout Fisher is a good configuration for serious fishing since you get a big cockpit instead of lots of infrequently-used cabin space. That said, the 575RF is more than just a runabout, as there is a walkthrough ‘cuddy’ offering dry storage, short bunks or kids’ beds, an optional portable toilet, and general weather protection.

Indeed, you should be able to lure mum aboard the 575RF, but without compromising that all-important ‘fishability.’ And that’s important when there are an estimated four million anglers in Australia and a lot more mums.

PRICE AND EQUIPMENT
- Right price for the quality and kit
The 575RF sells from $62,000 with the recommended 140hp Suzuki four-stroke outboard on dual-axle, braked Dunbier trailer. Our test boat with the maximum 175hp Suzuki outboard  and a boatload of extras cost $78,000 from newly appointed Signature dealers goodtimesmarine.com.au.

Even Blind Freddy could see the extra fruit on our 575RF demonstrator meant it was optioned for serious fishing. Specifically, the boat included the outboard upgrade, Garmin electronics, side-pocket inserts -- they create a second storage tier -- bow rail (split), targa with (fold-down) rocket launcher and bimini, cockpit lights, bunk cushions, live-bait tank and deck wash, bait board, swim ladder, Portapotti and a bit more.

But for us it was the standard of finish and what you don’t see underfloor that makes the Signature product befitting of its price tag and a real sparring partner for imported sportfishers. The 575RF’s mouldings were exact, the stainless work impeccable, the hull foam filled, and the small GRP items like hatches produced mainly via a closed-mould process that gives a great finish.

Meantime, cold-climate Victorian boaters might consider two other options: clears between the targa and windscreen for total weather protection, and an electric anchor winch or windlass so you don’t need to leave the helm when snapper fishing. Provision is provided for mounting a windlass. We’d have outriggers instead in our Bermagui and northward-bound sportfisher.

LAYOUT AND ACCOMMODATION
- Far ranging and very fishable
The 575RF proved dry in reverse doing four knots, which is really very impressive. The deep engine well, with fold-down facility to accommodate bigger-block outboards during tilting, didn’t leak at all. Nor did the rubber-sealed ‘marlin’ door. Thus, the boat wears its maximum 175hp -- weighing 25kg more than the recommended 140hp model -- outboard really well.

Conversely, some hardcore anglers mightn’t like the twin swim steps either side of the outboard. They could be seen as an impediment when fighting a deep-slugging fish. There is a fold-up swim ladder on the step to port as well. That said, we’d mount a berley pot in the starboard step.

Thankfully, the steps didn’t dig in like you might think in reverse. And line clearance isn’t really such an issue since the Signature team pushed the splash well/transom back as far as they could in the cockpit.

The live-bait tank in the starboard corner isn’t the biggest around, but it should serve the purpose of most local anglers. There were four rod holders in the gunwales, as usual, with the optional rocket launcher beefed up to run a shotgun or long flat lines. We’d mount outriggers off the structure rather than deck, too.

The bait board, with sink, lure and tackle storage, washable lid, three rod holders and drink holders, plus knife holders, is a rather clever bit of work. It’s high enough that you can operate without doing in your back.

The 575RF also has a two/three person rear lounge that snaps away with a virtual single-handed movement. Bravo. Once you hook up, you can clear the decks in no time. The small storage net on its leading edge could, however, foul hooks.

Behind this lounge was a tidy bilge with Johnson pump and common plumbing line running through to the huge underfloor fish box, with 180-litre capacity and bifold/removable lid, and cabin footwell that you’d bung closed when storing fish.

Twin tackle-tray inserts are recessed into the hull sides, while the optional side-pocket inserts included integrated moulded fish measuring ‘tapes.’ A nice touch. Toe kicks and thigh support make leaning outboard to fight or trace a fish just as reassuring.

Underfloor again, the 220-litre long-range fuel tank can be accessed/removed by unscrewing some self tappers in the grippy non-skid floor panel and trimming the Sikaflex. We like that you can actually remove it without having to cut the fibreglass floor.

We noted storage for personal effects here and there and, with the upgraded side pockets, room to stow safety gear including EPIRB and extinguisher either side of the Signature helm seats.

The wide-load (our term) helm seats are high backed and very accommodating. The seats slide and swivel and include storage nets. Nearby, moulded side steps assist with exiting the boat onto, say, a wharf, just as we did.

There is a built-in icebox/glove box ahead of the co-pilot that has an overboard drain, a ledge for your phone at the dash, while the Australian-made Alfab windscreen is a terrific bit of work, strong enough to double as a grab rail, and without a drop of distortion.

Grab rails exists in the cockpit for crew; LED lights and an overhead cockpit light were provided and, we’re told, illuminate the decks nicely before sun up… when our 575RF first hit the water.

The centre windscreen pane and full-length foredeck hatch open to grant unfettered walk-through access to the anchor locker and bow sprit.

We closed the hatches and lolled about the cabin, noting dry storage, portable loo, and seated headroom. Kids or sick crew can recoup here. Optional cushions add to the comforts.

MECHANICAL AND HULL
- Great fibreglass build quality
We’d put the batteries in a box, preferably up off the floor, but at least they are low-maintenance types. And the Haines Group’s is to be commended for its self-managing battery-switch system, with emergency switching and circuit protection.

Tucking our heads under the transom, we also noted good access to the fuel/water separator. But we’d definitely want a cover over the dash wiring in the cabin. It’s visually pleasing while also averting potential damage.

That said, it was nice to see labelled fuses and the tin wiring installation rates as excellent.

The stainless-steel work is another highlight from the in-house artisans who have been with Haines Marine for 21 years. Deck gear including the recessed cleats is all through-bolted.

This Signature Variable Deadrise Hull (SVDH) is, as touched on, different by design. It’s sharp forefoot quickly broadens into a forward ‘keel’ that appears to have the effect of providing extra lift.

But the boat is willing to plane at low speeds due more to the lift of its running surface with aggressive strakes that trap water/energy.

The hull itself is solid GRP, with a fully moulded liner bonded to the hull sides, and the voids and stringers foam filled, we’re told. This creates a monocoque or one-piece structure.

The boat is backed by a 10-year structural warranty. But along with reducing noise and adding strength, the foam has the added benefit of insulating the in-floor fish box.

In short, the Haines Group has invested millions in its boat-building technology which, it must be said, is truly world class. The increased use of closed moulds for details like seat bases, the bait board and lounge base are a step in the right direction and the yard has held its prices for the past four years, too.

ON THE WATER
- Offshore bound
The dash of the 575RF demonstrator accommodated a 12in Garmin touchscreen plus two additional GM10 multifunction displays that relayed everything you could imagine. A 15in can be squeezed into the dash and, with just a few rocker switches, it’s a modern, uncluttered design.

We had to check our outboard was running such was the Suzuki 175’s smoothness. The big-block 2867cc outboard claims to have the best power-to-weight in its class, with variable valve timing, 44 amp high-output alternator and multipoint fuel injection. Read oodles of grunt, running refinement and no smoke at all.

Spinning a 15¼ x 21in three-blade stainless-steel prop produced a WOT on this boat -- with four adults and a little gear -- of 6100rpm, which is smack as the engine maker desires. Somewhere amid the eye-watering runs we spotted 37 knots and climbing. Back around 4500rpm one could cruise in calm water around 25 knots.

The boat seemed quite lively. With a touch of negative trim, it was less likely to porpoise and, at the desirable economical setting of 4000rpm, we noted early-20 knot cruise speeds. That’s just a nice speed at sea, allowing you to spot fish on the way to grounds, saving your tackle and back from damage.

With that touch on in-trim we copped an odd lashing of spray from the forward quarter but managed to keep the boat glued to the water. Then we tugged on the reins and headed out to our fishing grounds at around 15 knots at 3500rpm.

Amazingly, this hull will plane right down to 8 knots. This means you might be able to troll frugally at planing speeds. It could also be handy in heavy weather as you shouldn’t have to ride the throttle as often as traditional deep-vee hulls.

I thought the freeboard up front, astern and throughout the cockpit added to the sense of security on a day where there was some weather about, with a brisk winter south westerly, some 1.5 metres of swell and cross sea. It was entirely fishable but not a day in which you could head east at breakneck speeds in this boat.

When quizzed, John Haines Junior told BoatPoint and Boatsales that his late dad did most of the revolutionary work with their patented concave variable deadrise hull. Unlike convex hulls, the Signature model displaces and places water neatly to the side. The water can be seen curling away in most running shots, Haines says.

This 575RF hull is, however, more of a departure than others, with a "kicker" or step just behind the entry. Haines calls it an anti-sneeze device to stop spray being squeezed forward.

Meantime, there’s a sharp entry to cleave the swell, a Delta plank, and quite a flat run to the chines for stability. In short, there’s a lot going on and the boat makes good use of water flow and energy to derive its exceptional lift.

VERDICT
- Faithful fisher with great finish and layout
Okay, so that aforesaid artificial reef off Sydney was swarming with, er, nothing more than lure-nibbling leatherjackets. Eek! We even foul hooked one from the piranha-like swarm below. But in fishing mode, in a bit of winter slop, the 575RF proved surefooted and reassuring.

Underway, it isn’t a greyhound but more of a workhorse that will return some very comfortable and economical cruise speeds. I think the average aspiring boater will be happy running the boat where it’s both dry and comfortable. It’s more a thinking-man’s ride than a young-gun thing.

At factory level, we like the fact you can build a 575RF with all the fishing features integrated into the design. You might also note that Suzuki outboards, imported by the Haines Group, are gaining commercial acceptance and in use by charter operators, crabbers, water police and hire boats, too.

We’re not sure if this is the holy grail of fishing boats but it is a stellar example of what one of our better Australian trailerboat builders can do, especially in the fit and finish department.

The all-important price remains competitive in the face of all the imports that usually come with much, much higher running costs. And we have it from the horse’s mouth that more big Signature launches are planned. Watch this space.

RATINGS
Overall rating: 4.8/5.0
Mechanical/equipment: 4.8/5.0
Packaging and practicality: 4.9/5.0
On the water performance: 4.7/5.0
Value for money: 4.7/5.0
X-factor: 4.8/5.0

Specifications:
Price: $78,000 as tested with 175hp, from $62,000 with 140hp.
LOA inc bowsprit: 5.95 m
Length: 5.70m
Beam: 2.38m
Deadrise: 21-33 degrees
Weight: 1000kg hull only
Towing weight: 1900kg (inc. fuel)
Engine: Suzuki 175hp four-stroke outboard 25in
Water: nil
Fuel: 222 litres
Berths: Two
People Day: Seven/630kg
Max. load: 830kg (people, fuel, gear)
BMT length: 7.12m
BMT height: 2.25m
BMT width: 2.38m

Supplied by:
The Haines Group
140 Viking Drive
Wacol, Qld, 4076
Tel: (07) 3271 4400
Web: www.thehainesgroup.com.au

 

Words By David Lockwood
http://www.redbook.com.au/boat-reviews/2012/cuddy---half-cabin/haines-signature/575rf/haines-signature-575rf-32034?csn_tnet=true

Haines Signature 575RF - Trade Boat Review BACK


Kevin Smith and the crew stared down Mother Nature in the face of some awful conditions when they tested the new Signature 575RF. But who would blink first?

 
HAINES SIGNATURE 575RF

Who would say no to a weekend of sun on Queensland’s Stradbroke Island, especially when it includes taking part in the annual Haines Group Fishing Classic and testing a few of the manufacturer’s latest offshore fishing machines? Not me, I can assure you.

I was supercharged at the thought of spending a few days fishing way offshore, in just the environment for which these boats are designed. I was especially excited at the idea of the Signature 575RF getting a thorough shakedown across the weekend.

Unfortunately my excitement levels were somewhat tempered as the competition kick-off grew closer, and some particularly foul weather moved in — a system wild enough to scare the bravest (or maybe wisest) of mariners off the water. Winds of 25-35kts in all directions and a 3-4m offshore swell were on the cards and for once the weather gurus were spot on. Not that it deterred us angling addicts; we were going fishing and boat testing no matter what.

 

SIGNATURE 575RF FISHING BOAT

On seeing the Haines Group’s 575RF for the first time those legendary flowing Signature lines are easily identifiable, even from a distance. But upon closer inspection I noticed the cab section to be a bit further forward than on other models, and the cockpit to be far larger. This was immediately appealing to me because, as far as I’m concerned, more workable fishing space is always a good thing.

As we started boarding, all the gear we were packing in made me realise this was not just a little fishing trip — it seemed we were planning on taking out every fish species in the competition. Light marlin tackle, plastics outfits, bait rods, crab pots, extra eskys, the list went on.

A 10-rod rocket launcher and plenty of rod holders in the gunwales stored the armoury, and all tackle was safely stowed away in dedicated, out-of-the-way areas.

The gunwales are super high on this boat, which is something I like not only for fishing against, but also for kids’ safety. In addition, the inner-gunwale panels are moulded which, besides looking exceptionally neat, actually works very well for storage. Speaking of storage, rather than just an open sidepocket there are little racks and compartments to put your gear in, which is a nice touch. And the small moulded step thoughtfully included by the designers is a welcome help when climbing in and out of the boat.

The transom is then set up with a fancy baitboard, more rod holders, door, livewell and a rear lounger. The lounger is recessed rather than protruding, which actually makes a huge difference when working up against the transom section. This type of design keeps the area neat and compact and maintains maximum fishing space.

Such a wide-open deck space makes getting in the way of a fellow angler and / or tangling lines a lot less likely; I reckon this boat could even fish four on-board without much trouble.

 

BIMINI PROTECTION

Up front the console and dash were snugly protected by the bimini and because the clears are mounted to the wraparound screen we didn’t have worry too much about getting wet in the rough conditions.

Perched in the soft captain’s seat, I quite liked the dash setup — it’s neat and compact, in keeping with the rest of the boat, but still with enough space for large flush-mount electronics and other gauges. I thought mounting the trim-tab switch to the flat panel alongside the controls was a particularly good idea. Simple but effective.

Entry into the cab is neatly centred with a portable toilet, small sleeping quarters and more storage space.

Overall I quite liked the layout on the 575RF. The designers have done a great job in maintaining maximum space while incorporating a lot of storage and maintaining a professional finish throughout. It works as well as a fishing boat as it does a family cruiser.

 

SIGNATURE 575RF ON THE WATER

Once we were finally loaded up and underway the 575RF was initially put through its paces in the bay because no boats were allowed to launch through the south passage bar due to the dangerous conditions.

Winds of 25-35kts and at least 1m of solid bay swell and chop were the entree to the competition — and probably the most comprehensive boat testing I have ever done.

As we left the little harbour I quickly realised why I probably should not have over indulged in a few drinks the night before. The 575RF was unleashed and it abused the foul conditions from get-go. The skipper was trying to be polite by initially driving a bit like Miss Daisy’s chauffer, but these hulls work better when the throttle is knocked down, and that’s what he soon did.

The boat’s plank design creates extra lift and a soft cushioning effect when laying into the chop and the hull works very well; we were able to maintain speeds of 25kts (46.3kmh) in the rough without being battered. You do need to hold on but it was still a comfortable ride considering the brutal conditions. Trim tabs also made a difference in that they allowed us to manipulate the ride to suit.

Stability was also good considering the conditions, as was the dryness of the ride. The clears meant there were no worries about getting wet, but either way the hull throws off spray nicely.

 

CROSSING THE BAR

The final test for the 575RF was a bar crossing the following day which, when I first surveyed the conditions, made me want to head back home to catch up on some chores. It was that bad. A 6ft swell from the north-east in short intervals growled at us, but being the hardcore anglers we are we were determined to get out and slay the marine life.

A good kilometre run through the surf had us running at all speeds, with some cool wave-carving needed in order to make our way out. Once past the surf the day was spent running long distances in far-from-ideal offshore conditions, as well as trolling and bottom bashing — not that any of it helped the zero on our score card. Incidentally, the photos we took in the rough simply weren’t worth publishing, so we headed for calmer inshore waters to get the shots you see here.

Head on, side on and running with the swell, the 575RF runs smooth and has a very safe feel to the ride. I also found it an easy boat to drive because you can set comfortable speeds without having to be on and off the throttle the whole time. No quibbles with this one.

 

THE TRAILERBOAT VERDICT

The 575RF is one of the Haines Group’s classic fishing weapons. This was really the ultimate in boats tests — extreme boating, really — and I was super impressed with the way the 575RF handled it all, especially considering it’s not exactly a huge boat.

Top-class finishes throughout with a very ergonomic fishing layout, it’s perfectly matched to the 175HP Suzuki four-stroke. While the 575RF is obviously geared towards serious offshore anglers it is also very well suited to family boaters. This one is a keeper.

In terms of price, you always get what you pay for and in this instance that is a well-built boat made to last, plus all of the abovementioned on-board gear. It’s one hell of a package.

 

ON THE PLANE...

· Classic fishability with good space and storage systems

· Ability to handle extreme conditions — very extreme

· Superb finishes throughout

 

DRAGGING THE CHAIN...

· After surviving those conditions how could I fault it?

 

SIGNATURE 575RF

HOW MUCH?

Price as tested: $78,000

Options fitted: Engine upgrade; targa; cockpit lights; sounder; toilet; bunk cushions

Priced from: $62,000

 

GENERAL

Type: Fishing boat

Material: GRP

Length: 5.95m (LOA)

Beam: 2.38m

Weight: 1900kg (BMT incl. fuel)

Deadrise: 21-33°

 

CAPACITIES

People: 7

Berths: 2

Rec. HP: 125-175

Max. HP: 175

Fuel: 220L

 

ENGINE

Make/Model: Suzuki DF175

Type: Four-stroke

Weight: 220kg

Displacement: 2867cc

Gear Ratio: 2.5:1

Propeller: Three-blade stainless steel

 

MANUFACTURED AND SUPPLIED BY

Signature Boats

The Haines Group

Wacol

Queensland 4076

Tel: (07) 3271 4400

Web: www.signatureboats.com.au

Originally published in TrailerBoat #297, July 2013.

 

Words By Kevin Smith
http://www.tradeboats.com.au/trailerboat-reviews/boats/1402/haines-signature-575rf-review/

Haines Signature 575RF - Trade Boat Review 2 BACK


We water test and rate the Signature 575RF from the Haines Group, a contender in the fibreglass fishing boats category at the 2014 Australia’s Greatest Boats awards.

There’s no doubt about it, the Haines family is back with a vengeance as this latest new generation Signature 575RF shows.

 

 

SIGNATURE 575RF REVIEW

And the Haines are in it to win. It’s been 40 years now since John Haines Snr got the "shiny arses" out of their management chairs and back into the factory to produce one of Australia’s favourite boats. This time around, history has repeated itself with all hands on deck to invigorate the Australian fibreglass boating fraternity with one hell of a walk-through runabout.

Fishos love Signature boats for their highly individual style, functional ergonomics and all-round great looks. But fishing boats need more; they also need hull integrity and a great ride. Signature introduced the SVDH (Signature Variable Deadrise Hull) many years ago and combined the ride of a big deep-vee with the stability of a punt at rest.

It was fitted with the sensational 175 Suzuki four-stroke; an engine that took the outboard market by storm with its quiet, effortless power. This outboard simply rocks the hull out of the hole and keeps it thundering right through the rev range. The power match is exhilarating, the engine driving the hull through tight turns or simply pushing the boat to its outright manic top speed.

This is a highly refined hull with a beautiful entry, a series of quite aggressive strakes and a keel plank for added lift. John Haines Jnr has certainly inherited his father’s design DNA.

 

SIGNATURE 575RF RATING

Fishing suitability

9

Innovation

8.6

Design and layout

9

Quality of finish

8.6

Handling and ride

8.2

Stability at rest

8.2

Ergonomics

8.3

Standard equipment

8

Value for money

8.8

X-Factor

8.2

TOTAL SCORE

84.9

 

UNDERSTANDING THE RATING SYSTEM 

 
Meet the judging panel

The rating criteria 
explained
 

 

THE JUDGES’ NOTEPAD

Angelo Sangiorgio: "Signature basically wrote the book on the runabout-style fishing boat and I think they’ve hit it on the head here again. The walkthrough is great. It gives you access to the bow for starters, but opening it up means you can stand in there on the casting deck and have a flick. The race bucket seats with flip-up bolsters are brilliant – they’re running the new stainless seat bases as well, with space for an Esky underneath. Everything old is new again!"

John Ford: "You could probably have about 18 people fishing from this boat, because you can spread them out up the front too. The walkthrough makes it easy to anchor and I like the cuddy cabin. It’s not really designed for sleeping in but it gives you plenty of storage. The fold-down baitboard is a fantastic innovation and the way they’ve sail-tracked the bimini onto the screen is good as well. A lot of thought has gone into it and those little things add up to a solid package."

Kevin Smith: "I’ve spent a helluva lot of time on this boat already. We’ve really properly tested this boat, in foul weather, in this competition, for fishing and as a camera boat. So I’ve spent plenty of hours on this boat and it’s earned a lot of respect. The fold-down lounge packs away neatly so it doesn’t affect your fishing in the stern and you’ve got the Eskys that serve as seats as well, so theoretically you could seat six or seven people pretty comfortably and that’s excluding the cab up the front."

Matt Jones: "The Signature was very well setup for fishing, I thought. It’s a very strong, very well-built hull.  I do like horsepower and this one definitely gets up and goes. It’s quiet, responsive and powerful – a great match and pretty good fuel economy. I’d even pay the excess-baggage fees to take one of these home to New Zealand with me."

 

SIGNATURE 575RF SPECIFICATIONS

LOA: 5.95m

BEAM: 2.38m

WEIGHT: Approx 1900kg (BMT)

MAX. HORSEPOWER: 175

BASE PRICE: $68,000 (Std w/140hp)

PRICE AS TESTED: $81,000

 

Review Supplied by www.tradeboats.com.au
http://www.tradeboats.com.au/trailerboat-news/best-boats/1406/signature-575rf-review-australias-greatest-fishing-boats/ 

Videos


Upholstery colours


Personalise your Siganture

Signature™ boats and Nautolex are proud to be associated with the PreFixx range of maritime seat vinyls - standard on all Signature™ models. Unsurpassed cleanability and wear from a marine seating fabric, PreFixx protection offers you the latest technology to remove stains that could never be removed before. With a test proven abrasion resistance, PreFixx protected products protect you from high maintenance costs and from frequent reupholstery costs. PreFixx protected Nautolex materials - cleanable with strong, active solvents without damage.

Primary Upholstery Colours
Secondary Upholstery Colours
Stitching Colours

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Trim colours


Personalise your Siganture

Standard Cloth Trim Colours
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575RF

Optional Extras

Configurations

Specifications

Mouled length with bowsprit 5.95m
Length 5.70m
Beam 2.38m
Deadrise 21−33°
Fuel 180L
Water N/A
Berths 2
Power outboard 115−175HP
Transom height 25"
Max outboard weight 240kg
Hull weight approx. 1,000kg
Towing weight approx. 1,900kg
BMT length approx. 7.12m
BMT height approx. 2.25m
BMT width approx. 2.38m
Max people 7/630kg
Max load 870kg

Haines Signature 575RF - Fishing World BACK

Haines Signature 575RF

01 Mar 2013

Fishing World - February 2013

Haines Signature’s 575RF is the first to feature the company’s new generation hull. As Scott Thomas finds out, fishing is a big part of the new boat’s design.

The Haines family has been making boats for more than 50 years, and in that time the Signature brand has deservedly built up a reputation for producing some top-notch boats. The Queensland-based boat builder announced the first of its new generation Signature hulls at last year’s Sydney International Boat Show, releasing the 575RF tested here.

According to the company, the 575RF is the first of more to come.

The 575RF and its new generation hull is the first new design since company founder John Haines Snr passed away in 2009. It’s also the first of what look to be more specialised fishing orientated boats, which is great news if you’re a serious offshore fisho in the market for a premium boat. Haines Signature has also signed up well-known TV presenter Paul Worsteling and will release a larger “signature” model featuring input from the TV show host.  

The new generation hull features the Signature Variable Deadrise (SVDH) concept. The hull is a completely new design over previous hull shapes. Not that there was anything wrong with the existing Signature hulls, of course! The new hull features a slightly sharper entry and a 21-degree deadrise. The front keel section has a redesigned step down, which Signature put in place to direct the spray coming forward from the wide plank back down at the water. Towards the transom, Signature has designed “built-in trim tabs” for slower planing speeds and to assist in attaining good fuel economy. These “tabs” are also handy for cruising around and trolling lures at slow speeds.

Fishing

While the hull itself has been given a major make-over, so has the overall layout, with a notable design trend towards fishing applications. The transom has been shortened to create more cockpit space and a portside transom door has been added to allow easy access on and off the boat. The rear lounge is very sturdy and folds down easily for additional space when the fishing action heats up. There’s also a handy netted section at the rear to stash leaders and other odds and ends.

Under each gunwale is an optional side box insert with side pocket storage and tackle trays. There’s also a useful fish measuring ruler, which may seem gimmicky, but it sure beats the old faded yellow sticker. The side box is a worthwhile optional extra. According to Haines, all customers so far have gone with this option.

Rod holders are positioned on the gunwale and can be customised to suit the individual fisho. There’s also a rod rocket launcher above the targa roof.

Under the floor sits a 220 litre poly fuel tank as standard. Haines Signature says the longevity of this material means it will outlast other fuel tank materials such as alloy and or stainless and doesn’t sweat as much. Sweating can cause moisture and that’s bad news for outboards. 

Further towards the bow there’s also a 200 litre capacity underfloor kill tank suitable for storing larger fish. There are two lids and they can be fully removed for easier access to remove the catch. The kill tank drains back to the auto bilge at the transom.

The business end

The helm area features two comfortable seats and there’s plenty of storage and space for essentials such as EPIRBs, VHF radio, stereos and so on in a handy recessed section.

The dash featured a 12-inch Garmin 5012 running a GSD24 black box and 1kW transducer.

This area would allow a 15 inch screen to be fitted with the help of a packer. With more and more fishos taking electronics very seriously, and spending big dollars on quality units, it’s good to see companies such as Haines Signature taking notice and designing boats with this in mind. 

The test boat also featured two Garmin GMI 10 units installed in place of traditional engine gauges. They’re not essential when the same data can be viewed on the main sounder unit, but for the convenience of not swapping screens, they’re a good idea.

The test boat also had fitted an Autotether which is basically a wireless auto kill switch that the skipper wears.

This handy device will cut the engine if the skipper goes overboard and can locate crew who also happen to go overboard.

The cabin bunk area has been shortened, now allowing space for storage. This boat has been designed for fishing and unnecessarily long bunks just impinge on valuable fishing space.

There was plenty of storage, however, and the test boat also featured a Porta Potti. Access to the bow is simple with a folding hatch allowing unimpeded access without having to crawl through a small hatch. The test boat didn’t feature an anchor winch, however, Signature has a couple of different winches on offer and it would make sense to have one installed.

On the water

The boat test day followed on from Haines Suzuki’s DF140A outboard launch. The Haines Group chose the new 575RF to be used as a camera boat for a bunch of media shooting photos of the new outboard. The new 140 was being tested on the smaller Signature 543F.

It was a good opportunity to sample the 575’s stability in testing conditions and with a few heavy blokes on board. Overall  stability was good and while we weren’t fishing, I have no doubt fishing three or four on board would present no problems whatsoever in reasonably rough sea conditions.

The stiff north-easterly persisted the following day and Queensland’s Moreton Bay is no place for an ill-equipped boat. Thankfully, the 575RF is far from that and the bay’s short steep chop provided a great testing ground for the new generation hull.

The boat remained nice and dry, despite steep chop, and the ride was comfortable. We cruised through the rougher water at about 18 knots and 3500 RPM. Back in the calmer water a comfortable and fuel-efficient cruising speed was 25 knots and 4200 RPM with a fuel reading of 0.6 litre per kilometer. The boat’s top speed was 38 knots at 6000RPM.
The 575 also featured optional trim tabs which also helped keep us level while travelling across the choppy bay. 

The 575RF is rated to a maximum 175hp. Signature fitted a Suzuki 175hp four stroke to the test boat, which was more than adequate with excellent acceleration and top end speed. Someone looking to save a few dollars could probably opt for the new DF140A and still have a very capable fishing boat with plenty of power.

With a wide range of options, a new fishing friendly design and an impressive hull, Haines Signature’s new generation of boats could be just the thing for offshore fishos in the market for a premium Aussie-made offshore sportfisher.

Scott Thomas

Fact Box

Length: 5.7m 
Beam: 2.38m 
Deadrise: 21-38 degrees 
HULL WEIGHT: 1000kg 
MAX HP: 175hp 
Price: From $64,999; as tested $86,874  
Contacts: Signatureboats.com.au

Words by Scott Thomas

Review Supplied By Fishing World
http://www.fishingworld.com.au/news/haines-signature-575rf

Haines Signature 575RF - Fishing Monthly Group BACK

DOWNLOAD TEST DATA

The Haines Signature 575RF fishing runabout is the Haines Group’s first all-new hull design since the passing in 2009 of ‘Senior’, the late John Haines OAM.

The Haines Group’s CEO, John Haines, has carried on his father’s tradition but has imprinted his own signature on the 575RF design with a finer bow entry, a small kicker or keel step just aft of the waterline contact point plus other hull changes.

Released last August, the design features plenty of cockpit fishing space and a relatively small cuddy suited for a sit-down or somewhere for the kids to sleep.

The 575 RF is a real angler’s boat yet the cuddy still offers dry storage, overhead shelving and space for a portable toilet. Access to the bow is simple, just swing out the windscreen centre section and the cuddy hatch. The anchor locker has a pad for an electric winch.

The 575 RF has a one-piece interior Nexus Liner, which is bonded to the hull and increases hull strength by up to 30% while allowing very easy clean-up after a busy day on the water.

The hull-motor package remains quite light, around 1900kg including fuel, allowing for ease of towing with a six-cylinder wagon or sedan.

In typical Haines Signature fashion, the test 575RF was impeccably finished and presented. Heritage shows here: this company has been making Signatures for almost 30 years, with refinement following refinement.

MEANT TO FISH

The test 575 RF came equipped with almost every bell and whistle available and a forest of rods bristled from the folding stainless bimini’s six holders. The full-height transom has a well-sealed door to port and when stepping aboard from the jetty, my feet remained dry – nice.

The Signature’s natty removable transom bait station comes with holders for drinks, rods, knife and pliers, a decent cutting board and a sink with a pressure tap.

The three-person rapid drop-down aft seat stows flat against the transom for active fishing and there’s easy access to the plumbed live-bait well in the starboard corner. Cockpit drainage is via an underfloor sump and pump.

The cockpit is loaded with features. A plumbed 200L fish box with dual lids sits in the floor just aft of skipper’s and mate’s pedestal seats and would handle even the most ambitious of catches.

The gunwales have recessed grab rails, there are two rod holders per side and 2.36m long side pockets have toe space below. A deck wash resides in the port pocket.

Tackle trays stack in the aft sides and a moulded-in tape measure is set along the port side pocket.

Above the port upper pocket are switches for the house battery, engine battery and there’s an emergency parallel switch as back-up.

There is LED lighting in the cockpit.

The heavy-duty forward seats slide and swivel and while seated the passenger has within reach a large side pocket and the insulated and drained glovebox, which doubles as an icebox for drinks and snacks. Naturally there is a passenger grab rail and a footrest.

HELM SHOWPIECE

The helm is a Haines Signature showpiece with twin Garmin GMI 10 multi-function gauges above a Garmin GPS Map 5012 screen.

The three-spoke wheel has switches, engine key and the side-mounted Suzuki controls within easy reach of the skipper, along with the marine radio and sound system. The skipper also has a footrest.

This 575RF had an Autotether man overboard wireless motor shut-off system which does away with the ubiquitous red lanyard – more smart technology.

PERFORMANCE

The 2867cc V6 Suzuki 175hp was almost silent at idle and the 575RF planed away with three aboard at an amazingly low 7.3 knots (13.6kmh) at 2700 rpm. One could troll skirts at that speed in calm conditions and save a lot of fuel in the process. Likewise, in choppy going that slow plane would avoid a lot of throttle jockeying.

At 3000rpm the Garmin recorded 12.7 knots (23.6kmh) and at 4000rpm 23 knots (42.8kmh). At 5000rpm we were doing 31 knots (57.3kmh) and at 6000rpm a blistering 40 knots (74.4kmh). I see 4000rpm and 23 knots as a smart way to travel.

Performance was certainly lively and a real strong point. As we cruised into a 15-knot south-east breeze, input from the Bennett trim tabs became useful but it was a very dry and trouble-free ride all round. The bow sliced through chop cleanly, the plank under the hull and large reversed chines kept the Signature Variable Deadrise Hull perfectly on track.

At rest, given the relative lightness of the 5.7m hull, I was pleased to note little tendency whatsoever to lean.

As a specialised fishing craft, every desirable feature can be found in the Haines Signature 575RF. It’s strong, very well made and built to last – there’s a 10-year structural hull warranty.

The fish box, live-bait well and storage areas are large enough to be useful and the metre-high cockpit sides make this is one very safe offshore craft.

Driven sensibly, the 175hp Suzuki would return excellent fuel consumption although I would also consider 140hp power, so readily does this hull perform. And with 222L of fuel under the floor, there’d be a lot of cruising range.

The 575RF continues to show that those at the Haines Group pride themselves on turning out a top-quality product which sets standards for a lot of other Australian manufacturers.

On a Dunbier tandem trailer the test rig costs $78,000. To locate your nearest dealer call the Haines Group on 07 3271 4400 or visitwww.thehainesgroup.com.au .

SPECIFICATIONS

Hull length5.70m
Beam 2.38 m.
Length on trailer 7.10m
Height on trailer 2.0m to top of windscreen
Hull weight 1000kg
Deadrise 21°-33° variable
Fuel 222L
Capacity 7 adults
Power 140hp-175hp
Towing 4WD or large six-cylinder

 

Words By Wayne Kempe
http://www.fishingmonthly.com.au/Articles/Display/14166-New-Signature-same-flourish 

Haines Signature 575RF - RedBook Review BACK

Has the Haines Group really 'broken the mould' with this all-new hull?

HIGHS
- Great Australian build quality
- Abundant cockpit space
- Boatload of integrated fishing features and storage
- High freeboard ups safety factor
- Long-range fuel tank
- Frugal with super-slippery hull

LOWS
- Batteries need boxes/weather protection
- Protector/cover needed over dash wiring
- High-lift hull is a tad flighty with 175
- We copped the odd splash of the spray

OVERVIEW
- First new boat in years breaks mould
Everything about our impending test of the Signature 575RF was new: the boat, the outboard, the fishing gear, the latest king-prawn imitation soft-plastic lures, Sydney’s first offshore artificial reef, the 12in colour Garmin touchscreen showing us the way and, soon, to the fish to be caught asunder.

In fact, the all-new Signature 575RF is the Haines Group’s first completely new boat since the passing of company founder and boating legend John Haines Senior in 2009. You could say it’s been a long time coming, but good things come to those who wait and, we hoped, wet a line.

Slotting comfortably between the company’s popular 543RF and 600RF, the 575RF features a completely new take on the company’s variable-deadrise hull. It looks unconventional head on, as revealed in our previous news story.

We’ll get to our on-water impressions, meantime, a line or two from the revered Gold Coast yard.

 "We feel we have achieved the perfect combination of performance through the water under power and stability at rest, developing arguably the most stable fishing platform ever," John Haines Junior told Boatsales and BoatPoint during the new Signature’s official unveiling at the Sydney International Boat Show on August 2.

"Not only does the 575RF boast the most stable platform but also the largest for its size, while still remaining comfortably within legal towing limits," he added. Indeed, the all-up towing weight of 1900kg (including fuel) means the 575RF isn’t a handful to lug, launch and retrieve with a modest four-wheeler or family wagon.

Meantime, The RF or Runabout Fisher is a good configuration for serious fishing since you get a big cockpit instead of lots of infrequently-used cabin space. That said, the 575RF is more than just a runabout, as there is a walkthrough ‘cuddy’ offering dry storage, short bunks or kids’ beds, an optional portable toilet, and general weather protection.

Indeed, you should be able to lure mum aboard the 575RF, but without compromising that all-important ‘fishability.’ And that’s important when there are an estimated four million anglers in Australia and a lot more mums.

PRICE AND EQUIPMENT
- Right price for the quality and kit
The 575RF sells from $62,000 with the recommended 140hp Suzuki four-stroke outboard on dual-axle, braked Dunbier trailer. Our test boat with the maximum 175hp Suzuki outboard  and a boatload of extras cost $78,000 from newly appointed Signature dealers goodtimesmarine.com.au.

Even Blind Freddy could see the extra fruit on our 575RF demonstrator meant it was optioned for serious fishing. Specifically, the boat included the outboard upgrade, Garmin electronics, side-pocket inserts -- they create a second storage tier -- bow rail (split), targa with (fold-down) rocket launcher and bimini, cockpit lights, bunk cushions, live-bait tank and deck wash, bait board, swim ladder, Portapotti and a bit more.

But for us it was the standard of finish and what you don’t see underfloor that makes the Signature product befitting of its price tag and a real sparring partner for imported sportfishers. The 575RF’s mouldings were exact, the stainless work impeccable, the hull foam filled, and the small GRP items like hatches produced mainly via a closed-mould process that gives a great finish.

Meantime, cold-climate Victorian boaters might consider two other options: clears between the targa and windscreen for total weather protection, and an electric anchor winch or windlass so you don’t need to leave the helm when snapper fishing. Provision is provided for mounting a windlass. We’d have outriggers instead in our Bermagui and northward-bound sportfisher.

LAYOUT AND ACCOMMODATION
- Far ranging and very fishable
The 575RF proved dry in reverse doing four knots, which is really very impressive. The deep engine well, with fold-down facility to accommodate bigger-block outboards during tilting, didn’t leak at all. Nor did the rubber-sealed ‘marlin’ door. Thus, the boat wears its maximum 175hp -- weighing 25kg more than the recommended 140hp model -- outboard really well.

Conversely, some hardcore anglers mightn’t like the twin swim steps either side of the outboard. They could be seen as an impediment when fighting a deep-slugging fish. There is a fold-up swim ladder on the step to port as well. That said, we’d mount a berley pot in the starboard step.

Thankfully, the steps didn’t dig in like you might think in reverse. And line clearance isn’t really such an issue since the Signature team pushed the splash well/transom back as far as they could in the cockpit.

The live-bait tank in the starboard corner isn’t the biggest around, but it should serve the purpose of most local anglers. There were four rod holders in the gunwales, as usual, with the optional rocket launcher beefed up to run a shotgun or long flat lines. We’d mount outriggers off the structure rather than deck, too.

The bait board, with sink, lure and tackle storage, washable lid, three rod holders and drink holders, plus knife holders, is a rather clever bit of work. It’s high enough that you can operate without doing in your back.

The 575RF also has a two/three person rear lounge that snaps away with a virtual single-handed movement. Bravo. Once you hook up, you can clear the decks in no time. The small storage net on its leading edge could, however, foul hooks.

Behind this lounge was a tidy bilge with Johnson pump and common plumbing line running through to the huge underfloor fish box, with 180-litre capacity and bifold/removable lid, and cabin footwell that you’d bung closed when storing fish.

Twin tackle-tray inserts are recessed into the hull sides, while the optional side-pocket inserts included integrated moulded fish measuring ‘tapes.’ A nice touch. Toe kicks and thigh support make leaning outboard to fight or trace a fish just as reassuring.

Underfloor again, the 220-litre long-range fuel tank can be accessed/removed by unscrewing some self tappers in the grippy non-skid floor panel and trimming the Sikaflex. We like that you can actually remove it without having to cut the fibreglass floor.

We noted storage for personal effects here and there and, with the upgraded side pockets, room to stow safety gear including EPIRB and extinguisher either side of the Signature helm seats.

The wide-load (our term) helm seats are high backed and very accommodating. The seats slide and swivel and include storage nets. Nearby, moulded side steps assist with exiting the boat onto, say, a wharf, just as we did.

There is a built-in icebox/glove box ahead of the co-pilot that has an overboard drain, a ledge for your phone at the dash, while the Australian-made Alfab windscreen is a terrific bit of work, strong enough to double as a grab rail, and without a drop of distortion.

Grab rails exists in the cockpit for crew; LED lights and an overhead cockpit light were provided and, we’re told, illuminate the decks nicely before sun up… when our 575RF first hit the water.

The centre windscreen pane and full-length foredeck hatch open to grant unfettered walk-through access to the anchor locker and bow sprit.

We closed the hatches and lolled about the cabin, noting dry storage, portable loo, and seated headroom. Kids or sick crew can recoup here. Optional cushions add to the comforts.

MECHANICAL AND HULL
- Great fibreglass build quality
We’d put the batteries in a box, preferably up off the floor, but at least they are low-maintenance types. And the Haines Group’s is to be commended for its self-managing battery-switch system, with emergency switching and circuit protection.

Tucking our heads under the transom, we also noted good access to the fuel/water separator. But we’d definitely want a cover over the dash wiring in the cabin. It’s visually pleasing while also averting potential damage.

That said, it was nice to see labelled fuses and the tin wiring installation rates as excellent.

The stainless-steel work is another highlight from the in-house artisans who have been with Haines Marine for 21 years. Deck gear including the recessed cleats is all through-bolted.

This Signature Variable Deadrise Hull (SVDH) is, as touched on, different by design. It’s sharp forefoot quickly broadens into a forward ‘keel’ that appears to have the effect of providing extra lift.

But the boat is willing to plane at low speeds due more to the lift of its running surface with aggressive strakes that trap water/energy.

The hull itself is solid GRP, with a fully moulded liner bonded to the hull sides, and the voids and stringers foam filled, we’re told. This creates a monocoque or one-piece structure.

The boat is backed by a 10-year structural warranty. But along with reducing noise and adding strength, the foam has the added benefit of insulating the in-floor fish box.

In short, the Haines Group has invested millions in its boat-building technology which, it must be said, is truly world class. The increased use of closed moulds for details like seat bases, the bait board and lounge base are a step in the right direction and the yard has held its prices for the past four years, too.

ON THE WATER
- Offshore bound
The dash of the 575RF demonstrator accommodated a 12in Garmin touchscreen plus two additional GM10 multifunction displays that relayed everything you could imagine. A 15in can be squeezed into the dash and, with just a few rocker switches, it’s a modern, uncluttered design.

We had to check our outboard was running such was the Suzuki 175’s smoothness. The big-block 2867cc outboard claims to have the best power-to-weight in its class, with variable valve timing, 44 amp high-output alternator and multipoint fuel injection. Read oodles of grunt, running refinement and no smoke at all.

Spinning a 15¼ x 21in three-blade stainless-steel prop produced a WOT on this boat -- with four adults and a little gear -- of 6100rpm, which is smack as the engine maker desires. Somewhere amid the eye-watering runs we spotted 37 knots and climbing. Back around 4500rpm one could cruise in calm water around 25 knots.

The boat seemed quite lively. With a touch of negative trim, it was less likely to porpoise and, at the desirable economical setting of 4000rpm, we noted early-20 knot cruise speeds. That’s just a nice speed at sea, allowing you to spot fish on the way to grounds, saving your tackle and back from damage.

With that touch on in-trim we copped an odd lashing of spray from the forward quarter but managed to keep the boat glued to the water. Then we tugged on the reins and headed out to our fishing grounds at around 15 knots at 3500rpm.

Amazingly, this hull will plane right down to 8 knots. This means you might be able to troll frugally at planing speeds. It could also be handy in heavy weather as you shouldn’t have to ride the throttle as often as traditional deep-vee hulls.

I thought the freeboard up front, astern and throughout the cockpit added to the sense of security on a day where there was some weather about, with a brisk winter south westerly, some 1.5 metres of swell and cross sea. It was entirely fishable but not a day in which you could head east at breakneck speeds in this boat.

When quizzed, John Haines Junior told BoatPoint and Boatsales that his late dad did most of the revolutionary work with their patented concave variable deadrise hull. Unlike convex hulls, the Signature model displaces and places water neatly to the side. The water can be seen curling away in most running shots, Haines says.

This 575RF hull is, however, more of a departure than others, with a "kicker" or step just behind the entry. Haines calls it an anti-sneeze device to stop spray being squeezed forward.

Meantime, there’s a sharp entry to cleave the swell, a Delta plank, and quite a flat run to the chines for stability. In short, there’s a lot going on and the boat makes good use of water flow and energy to derive its exceptional lift.

VERDICT
- Faithful fisher with great finish and layout
Okay, so that aforesaid artificial reef off Sydney was swarming with, er, nothing more than lure-nibbling leatherjackets. Eek! We even foul hooked one from the piranha-like swarm below. But in fishing mode, in a bit of winter slop, the 575RF proved surefooted and reassuring.

Underway, it isn’t a greyhound but more of a workhorse that will return some very comfortable and economical cruise speeds. I think the average aspiring boater will be happy running the boat where it’s both dry and comfortable. It’s more a thinking-man’s ride than a young-gun thing.

At factory level, we like the fact you can build a 575RF with all the fishing features integrated into the design. You might also note that Suzuki outboards, imported by the Haines Group, are gaining commercial acceptance and in use by charter operators, crabbers, water police and hire boats, too.

We’re not sure if this is the holy grail of fishing boats but it is a stellar example of what one of our better Australian trailerboat builders can do, especially in the fit and finish department.

The all-important price remains competitive in the face of all the imports that usually come with much, much higher running costs. And we have it from the horse’s mouth that more big Signature launches are planned. Watch this space.

RATINGS
Overall rating: 4.8/5.0
Mechanical/equipment: 4.8/5.0
Packaging and practicality: 4.9/5.0
On the water performance: 4.7/5.0
Value for money: 4.7/5.0
X-factor: 4.8/5.0

Specifications:
Price: $78,000 as tested with 175hp, from $62,000 with 140hp.
LOA inc bowsprit: 5.95 m
Length: 5.70m
Beam: 2.38m
Deadrise: 21-33 degrees
Weight: 1000kg hull only
Towing weight: 1900kg (inc. fuel)
Engine: Suzuki 175hp four-stroke outboard 25in
Water: nil
Fuel: 222 litres
Berths: Two
People Day: Seven/630kg
Max. load: 830kg (people, fuel, gear)
BMT length: 7.12m
BMT height: 2.25m
BMT width: 2.38m

Supplied by:
The Haines Group
140 Viking Drive
Wacol, Qld, 4076
Tel: (07) 3271 4400
Web: www.thehainesgroup.com.au

 

Words By David Lockwood
http://www.redbook.com.au/boat-reviews/2012/cuddy---half-cabin/haines-signature/575rf/haines-signature-575rf-32034?csn_tnet=true

Haines Signature 575RF - Trade Boat Review BACK

Kevin Smith and the crew stared down Mother Nature in the face of some awful conditions when they tested the new Signature 575RF. But who would blink first?

 
HAINES SIGNATURE 575RF

Who would say no to a weekend of sun on Queensland’s Stradbroke Island, especially when it includes taking part in the annual Haines Group Fishing Classic and testing a few of the manufacturer’s latest offshore fishing machines? Not me, I can assure you.

I was supercharged at the thought of spending a few days fishing way offshore, in just the environment for which these boats are designed. I was especially excited at the idea of the Signature 575RF getting a thorough shakedown across the weekend.

Unfortunately my excitement levels were somewhat tempered as the competition kick-off grew closer, and some particularly foul weather moved in — a system wild enough to scare the bravest (or maybe wisest) of mariners off the water. Winds of 25-35kts in all directions and a 3-4m offshore swell were on the cards and for once the weather gurus were spot on. Not that it deterred us angling addicts; we were going fishing and boat testing no matter what.

 

SIGNATURE 575RF FISHING BOAT

On seeing the Haines Group’s 575RF for the first time those legendary flowing Signature lines are easily identifiable, even from a distance. But upon closer inspection I noticed the cab section to be a bit further forward than on other models, and the cockpit to be far larger. This was immediately appealing to me because, as far as I’m concerned, more workable fishing space is always a good thing.

As we started boarding, all the gear we were packing in made me realise this was not just a little fishing trip — it seemed we were planning on taking out every fish species in the competition. Light marlin tackle, plastics outfits, bait rods, crab pots, extra eskys, the list went on.

A 10-rod rocket launcher and plenty of rod holders in the gunwales stored the armoury, and all tackle was safely stowed away in dedicated, out-of-the-way areas.

The gunwales are super high on this boat, which is something I like not only for fishing against, but also for kids’ safety. In addition, the inner-gunwale panels are moulded which, besides looking exceptionally neat, actually works very well for storage. Speaking of storage, rather than just an open sidepocket there are little racks and compartments to put your gear in, which is a nice touch. And the small moulded step thoughtfully included by the designers is a welcome help when climbing in and out of the boat.

The transom is then set up with a fancy baitboard, more rod holders, door, livewell and a rear lounger. The lounger is recessed rather than protruding, which actually makes a huge difference when working up against the transom section. This type of design keeps the area neat and compact and maintains maximum fishing space.

Such a wide-open deck space makes getting in the way of a fellow angler and / or tangling lines a lot less likely; I reckon this boat could even fish four on-board without much trouble.

 

BIMINI PROTECTION

Up front the console and dash were snugly protected by the bimini and because the clears are mounted to the wraparound screen we didn’t have worry too much about getting wet in the rough conditions.

Perched in the soft captain’s seat, I quite liked the dash setup — it’s neat and compact, in keeping with the rest of the boat, but still with enough space for large flush-mount electronics and other gauges. I thought mounting the trim-tab switch to the flat panel alongside the controls was a particularly good idea. Simple but effective.

Entry into the cab is neatly centred with a portable toilet, small sleeping quarters and more storage space.

Overall I quite liked the layout on the 575RF. The designers have done a great job in maintaining maximum space while incorporating a lot of storage and maintaining a professional finish throughout. It works as well as a fishing boat as it does a family cruiser.

 

SIGNATURE 575RF ON THE WATER

Once we were finally loaded up and underway the 575RF was initially put through its paces in the bay because no boats were allowed to launch through the south passage bar due to the dangerous conditions.

Winds of 25-35kts and at least 1m of solid bay swell and chop were the entree to the competition — and probably the most comprehensive boat testing I have ever done.

As we left the little harbour I quickly realised why I probably should not have over indulged in a few drinks the night before. The 575RF was unleashed and it abused the foul conditions from get-go. The skipper was trying to be polite by initially driving a bit like Miss Daisy’s chauffer, but these hulls work better when the throttle is knocked down, and that’s what he soon did.

The boat’s plank design creates extra lift and a soft cushioning effect when laying into the chop and the hull works very well; we were able to maintain speeds of 25kts (46.3kmh) in the rough without being battered. You do need to hold on but it was still a comfortable ride considering the brutal conditions. Trim tabs also made a difference in that they allowed us to manipulate the ride to suit.

Stability was also good considering the conditions, as was the dryness of the ride. The clears meant there were no worries about getting wet, but either way the hull throws off spray nicely.

 

CROSSING THE BAR

The final test for the 575RF was a bar crossing the following day which, when I first surveyed the conditions, made me want to head back home to catch up on some chores. It was that bad. A 6ft swell from the north-east in short intervals growled at us, but being the hardcore anglers we are we were determined to get out and slay the marine life.

A good kilometre run through the surf had us running at all speeds, with some cool wave-carving needed in order to make our way out. Once past the surf the day was spent running long distances in far-from-ideal offshore conditions, as well as trolling and bottom bashing — not that any of it helped the zero on our score card. Incidentally, the photos we took in the rough simply weren’t worth publishing, so we headed for calmer inshore waters to get the shots you see here.

Head on, side on and running with the swell, the 575RF runs smooth and has a very safe feel to the ride. I also found it an easy boat to drive because you can set comfortable speeds without having to be on and off the throttle the whole time. No quibbles with this one.

 

THE TRAILERBOAT VERDICT

The 575RF is one of the Haines Group’s classic fishing weapons. This was really the ultimate in boats tests — extreme boating, really — and I was super impressed with the way the 575RF handled it all, especially considering it’s not exactly a huge boat.

Top-class finishes throughout with a very ergonomic fishing layout, it’s perfectly matched to the 175HP Suzuki four-stroke. While the 575RF is obviously geared towards serious offshore anglers it is also very well suited to family boaters. This one is a keeper.

In terms of price, you always get what you pay for and in this instance that is a well-built boat made to last, plus all of the abovementioned on-board gear. It’s one hell of a package.

 

ON THE PLANE...

· Classic fishability with good space and storage systems

· Ability to handle extreme conditions — very extreme

· Superb finishes throughout

 

DRAGGING THE CHAIN...

· After surviving those conditions how could I fault it?

 

SIGNATURE 575RF

HOW MUCH?

Price as tested: $78,000

Options fitted: Engine upgrade; targa; cockpit lights; sounder; toilet; bunk cushions

Priced from: $62,000

 

GENERAL

Type: Fishing boat

Material: GRP

Length: 5.95m (LOA)

Beam: 2.38m

Weight: 1900kg (BMT incl. fuel)

Deadrise: 21-33°

 

CAPACITIES

People: 7

Berths: 2

Rec. HP: 125-175

Max. HP: 175

Fuel: 220L

 

ENGINE

Make/Model: Suzuki DF175

Type: Four-stroke

Weight: 220kg

Displacement: 2867cc

Gear Ratio: 2.5:1

Propeller: Three-blade stainless steel

 

MANUFACTURED AND SUPPLIED BY

Signature Boats

The Haines Group

Wacol

Queensland 4076

Tel: (07) 3271 4400

Web: www.signatureboats.com.au

Originally published in TrailerBoat #297, July 2013.

 

Words By Kevin Smith
http://www.tradeboats.com.au/trailerboat-reviews/boats/1402/haines-signature-575rf-review/

Haines Signature 575RF - Trade Boat Review 2 BACK

We water test and rate the Signature 575RF from the Haines Group, a contender in the fibreglass fishing boats category at the 2014 Australia’s Greatest Boats awards.

There’s no doubt about it, the Haines family is back with a vengeance as this latest new generation Signature 575RF shows.

 

 

SIGNATURE 575RF REVIEW

And the Haines are in it to win. It’s been 40 years now since John Haines Snr got the "shiny arses" out of their management chairs and back into the factory to produce one of Australia’s favourite boats. This time around, history has repeated itself with all hands on deck to invigorate the Australian fibreglass boating fraternity with one hell of a walk-through runabout.

Fishos love Signature boats for their highly individual style, functional ergonomics and all-round great looks. But fishing boats need more; they also need hull integrity and a great ride. Signature introduced the SVDH (Signature Variable Deadrise Hull) many years ago and combined the ride of a big deep-vee with the stability of a punt at rest.

It was fitted with the sensational 175 Suzuki four-stroke; an engine that took the outboard market by storm with its quiet, effortless power. This outboard simply rocks the hull out of the hole and keeps it thundering right through the rev range. The power match is exhilarating, the engine driving the hull through tight turns or simply pushing the boat to its outright manic top speed.

This is a highly refined hull with a beautiful entry, a series of quite aggressive strakes and a keel plank for added lift. John Haines Jnr has certainly inherited his father’s design DNA.

 

SIGNATURE 575RF RATING

Fishing suitability

9

Innovation

8.6

Design and layout

9

Quality of finish

8.6

Handling and ride

8.2

Stability at rest

8.2

Ergonomics

8.3

Standard equipment

8

Value for money

8.8

X-Factor

8.2

TOTAL SCORE

84.9

 

UNDERSTANDING THE RATING SYSTEM 

 
Meet the judging panel

The rating criteria 
explained
 

 

THE JUDGES’ NOTEPAD

Angelo Sangiorgio: "Signature basically wrote the book on the runabout-style fishing boat and I think they’ve hit it on the head here again. The walkthrough is great. It gives you access to the bow for starters, but opening it up means you can stand in there on the casting deck and have a flick. The race bucket seats with flip-up bolsters are brilliant – they’re running the new stainless seat bases as well, with space for an Esky underneath. Everything old is new again!"

John Ford: "You could probably have about 18 people fishing from this boat, because you can spread them out up the front too. The walkthrough makes it easy to anchor and I like the cuddy cabin. It’s not really designed for sleeping in but it gives you plenty of storage. The fold-down baitboard is a fantastic innovation and the way they’ve sail-tracked the bimini onto the screen is good as well. A lot of thought has gone into it and those little things add up to a solid package."

Kevin Smith: "I’ve spent a helluva lot of time on this boat already. We’ve really properly tested this boat, in foul weather, in this competition, for fishing and as a camera boat. So I’ve spent plenty of hours on this boat and it’s earned a lot of respect. The fold-down lounge packs away neatly so it doesn’t affect your fishing in the stern and you’ve got the Eskys that serve as seats as well, so theoretically you could seat six or seven people pretty comfortably and that’s excluding the cab up the front."

Matt Jones: "The Signature was very well setup for fishing, I thought. It’s a very strong, very well-built hull.  I do like horsepower and this one definitely gets up and goes. It’s quiet, responsive and powerful – a great match and pretty good fuel economy. I’d even pay the excess-baggage fees to take one of these home to New Zealand with me."

 

SIGNATURE 575RF SPECIFICATIONS

LOA: 5.95m

BEAM: 2.38m

WEIGHT: Approx 1900kg (BMT)

MAX. HORSEPOWER: 175

BASE PRICE: $68,000 (Std w/140hp)

PRICE AS TESTED: $81,000

 

Review Supplied by www.tradeboats.com.au
http://www.tradeboats.com.au/trailerboat-news/best-boats/1406/signature-575rf-review-australias-greatest-fishing-boats/ 

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